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Poverty Programs, Initiation Of Prenatal Care And The Rate Of Low Birthweight Births

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  • Richard G. Frank
  • Donna Strobino
  • David S. Salkever
  • Catherine Jackson
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    Abstract

    This paper specifies and estimates an econometric model of low and very low birthweight rates for counties in the U.S. for the years 1975-1984. We focus on the impact of several specific public policy actions on use of prenatal care and the subsequent effect on birthweight outcomes. Our results point to strong racial differences in the impact of prenatal care on low birthweight rates. We also find that for the white population changes in income eligibility standards and expanded availability of publicly financed maternal and infant clinics have the strongest impacts on low birthweight rates.

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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w3215.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 3215.

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    Date of creation: Dec 1989
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    Publication status: published as Journal of Human Resources, vol.27, no.4, pp.629-642, 1992.
    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:3215

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    1. Corman, Hope & Grossman, Michael, 1985. "Determinants of neonatal mortality rates in the U.S. : A reduced form model," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 213-236, September.
    2. Hope Corman & Theodore J. Joyce & Michael Grossman, 1985. "Birth Outcome Production Functions in the U.S," NBER Working Papers 1729, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Jeffrey E. Harris, 1982. "Prenatal Medical Care and Infant Mortality," NBER Chapters, in: Economic Aspects of Health, pages 13-52 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Hausman, Jerry A. & Taylor, William E., 1981. "Panel data and unobservable individual effects," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 155-155, May.
    5. Mark R. Rosenzweig & T. Paul Schultz, 1982. "The Behavior of Mothers as Inputs to Child Health: The Determinants of Birth Weight, Gestation, and Rate of Fetal Growth," NBER Chapters, in: Economic Aspects of Health, pages 53-92 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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