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Estimates of Crowd-Out from a Public Health Insurance Expansion Using Administrative Data

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  • Laura Dague
  • Thomas DeLeire
  • Donna Friedsam
  • Daphne Kuo
  • Lindsey Leininger
  • Sarah Meier
  • Kristen Voskuil

Abstract

We use a combination of administrative and survey data to estimate the fraction of individuals newly enrolled in public health coverage (Wisconsin’s combined Medicaid and CHIP program) that had access to private, employer-sponsored health insurance at the time of their enrollment and the fraction that dropped this coverage. We estimate that after expansion of eligibility for public coverage, approximately 20% of new enrollees had access to private health insurance at the time of enrollment and that only 8% dropped this coverage (with the remaining 12% having both private and public coverage). We also identify an “upper bound” estimate, which suggests that the percentage of new enrollees with private insurance coverage at the time of enrollment is, at most, 27%. These estimates of crowd-out are relatively low compared with estimates from the literature based on Medicaid and CHIP expansions, although based both on different data and on a different method.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 17009.

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Date of creation: May 2011
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:17009

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  1. Esel Y. Yazici & Robert Kaestner, 1998. "Medicaid Expansions and The Crowding Out of Private Health Insurance," NBER Working Papers 6527, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Blumberg, Linda J. & Dubay, Lisa & Norton, Stephen A., 2000. "Did the Medicaid expansions for children displace private insurance? An analysis using the SIPP," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 33-60, January.
  3. Strumpf, Erin, 2011. "Medicaid's effect on single women's labor supply: Evidence from the introduction of Medicaid," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 531-548, May.
  4. Gruber, Jonathan & Simon, Kosali, 2008. "Crowd-out 10 years later: Have recent public insurance expansions crowded out private health insurance?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 201-217, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Koch, Thomas G., 2013. "Using RD design to understand heterogeneity in health insurance crowd-out," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 599-611.

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