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Does the Indexing of Government Transfers Make Carbon Pricing Progressive?

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  • Don Fullerton
  • Garth Heutel
  • Gilbert E. Metcalf

Abstract

We analyze both the uses side and the sources side incidence of domestic climate policy using an analytical general equilibrium model, taking into account the degree of government program indexing. When transfer programs such as Social Security are explicitly indexed to inflation, higher energy prices automatically lead to cost-of-living adjustments for recipients. We show results with no indexing, 100 percent indexing, and partial indexing based on our analysis of actual transfer programs. When households are classified by annual income, the indexing of U.S. transfers is not enough to offset the regressive uses side, but when they are classified by annual expenditures as a proxy for permanent income, transfer indexing does offset regressivity across the lowest income groups.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 16768.

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Date of creation: Feb 2011
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Publication status: published as Don Fullerton & Garth Heutel & Gilbert E. Metcalf, 2012. "Does the Indexing of Government Transfers Make Carbon Pricing Progressive?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 94(2), pages 347-353.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16768

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  1. Don Fullerton & Garth Heutel, 2010. "Analytical General Equilibrium Effects of Energy Policy on Output and Factor Prices," NBER Working Papers 15788, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Sebastian Rausch & Gilbert E. Metcalf & John M. Reilly & Sergey Paltsev, 2010. "Distributional Implications of Alternative U.S. Greenhouse Gas Control Measures," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0753, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  3. Burtraw, Dallas & Sweeney, Richard & Walls, Margaret, 2009. "The Incidence of U.S. Climate Policy: Alternative Uses of Revenues from a Cap-and-Trade Auction," Discussion Papers dp-09-17-rev, Resources For the Future.
  4. Burtraw, Dallas & Sweeney, Richard & Walls, Margaret, 2009. "The Incidence of U.S. Climate Policy: Alternative Uses of Revenues from a Cap-and-Trade Auction," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 62(3), pages 497-518, September.
  5. Kevin A. Hassett & Aparna Mathur & Gilbert E. Metcalf, 2009. "The Incidence of a U.S. Carbon Tax: A Lifetime and Regional Analysis," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 155-178.
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