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Risk Preferences in the PSID: Individual Imputations and Family Covariation

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  • Miles S. Kimball
  • Claudia R. Sahm
  • Matthew D. Shapiro

Abstract

Survey measures of preference parameters provide a means for accounting for otherwise unobserved heterogeneity.This paper presents measures of relative risk tolerance based on responses to survey questions about hypothetical gambles over lifetime income.It discusses how to impute estimates of utility function parameters from the survey responses using a statistical model that accounts for survey response error. There is substantial heterogeneity in true preference parameters even after survey response error is taken into account.The paper discusses how to use the preference parameters imputed from the survey responses in regression models as a control for differences in preferences across individuals. This paper focuses on imputations for respondents in the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID).It also studies the covariation of risk preferences among members of households.It finds fairly strong covariation in attitudes about risk -- between parents and children and especially between siblings and between spouses.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 14754.

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Date of creation: Feb 2009
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Publication status: published as Miles S. Kimball & Claudia R. Sahm & Matthew D. Shapiro, 2009. "Risk Preferences in the PSID: Individual Imputations and Family Covariation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 363-68, May.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:14754

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  1. Dohmen, Thomas & Falk, Armin & Huffman, David B. & Sunde, Uwe, 2006. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Risk and Trust Attitudes," IZA Discussion Papers 2380, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Ulrike Malmendier & Stefan Nagel, 2011. "Depression Babies: Do Macroeconomic Experiences Affect Risk Taking?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(1), pages 373-416.
  3. Miles S. Kimball & Matthew D. Shapiro, 2008. "Labor Supply: Are the Income and Substitution Effects Both Large or Both Small?," NBER Working Papers 14208, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Kimball, Miles S & Sahm, Claudia R & Shapiro, Matthew D, 2008. "Imputing Risk Tolerance From Survey Responses," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 103(483), pages 1028-1038.
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Blog mentions

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  1. Dan Benjamin, Mark Fontana and I Design an In-Depth Risk Aversion Survey
    by ? in Confessions of a Supply-Side Liberal on 2013-03-01 08:01:36
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Cited by:
  1. Gianluca Femminis, 2012. "Risk aversion heterogeneity and the investment-uncertainty relationship," DISCE - Quaderni dell'Istituto di Teoria Economica e Metodi Quantitativi itemq1260, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
  2. Marco Cozzi, 2013. "Risk Aversion Heterogeneity, Risky Jobs and Wealth Inequality," 2013 Meeting Papers 842, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  3. Dror Brenner & Yona Rubinstein, 2012. "Pride and prejudice: using ethnic-sounding names and inter-ethnic marriages to identify labor market discrimination," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 48932, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  4. Mark Cullen & Liran Einav & Amy Finkelstein & Iuliana Pascu, 2010. "How General Are Risk Preferences? Choices Under Uncertainty in Different Domains," Discussion Papers 09-005, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
  5. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00786245 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Arrondel, Luc & Masson, André, 2011. "L'épargnant dans un monde en crise — Ce qui a changé," Opuscules du CEPREMAP, CEPREMAP, number 23, May.
  7. Dror Brenner & Yona Rubinstein, 2012. "Pride and Prejudice: Using Ethnic-Sounding Names and Inter-Ethnic Marriages to Identify Labor Market Discrimination," CEP Discussion Papers dp1180, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  8. Nicolas FREMEAUX & Luc ARRONDEL, 2014. ""For richer, for poorer": savings preferences and choice of spouse," THEMA Working Papers 2014-03, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
  9. Liran Einav & Amy Finkelstein & Iuliana Pascu & Mark R. Cullen, 2010. "How general are risk preferences? Choices under uncertainty in different domains," NBER Working Papers 15686, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Gopi Shah Goda & Colleen Flaherty Manchester, 2010. "Incorporating Employee Heterogeneity Into Default Rules for Retirement Plan Selection," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2010-5, Center for Retirement Research.
  11. Leuermann, Andrea & Necker, Sarah, 2011. "Intergenerational transmission of risk attitudes: A revealed preference approach," Freiburg Discussion Papers on Constitutional Economics 11/4, Walter Eucken Institut e.V..
  12. Luc Arrondel, 2013. "Are “daddy’s boys” just as rich as daddy? The transmission of values between generations," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 439-471, December.
  13. Vieider, Ferdinand M. & Chmura, Thorsten & Martinsson, Peter, 2012. "Risk attitudes, development, and growth: Macroeconomic evidence from experiments in 30 countries," Discussion Papers, WZB Junior Research Group Risk and Development SP II 2012-401, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
  14. Necker, Sarah & Voskort, Andrea, 2014. "Intergenerational transmission of risk attitudes – A revealed preference approach," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 66-89.
  15. Andrea Leuermann & Sarah Necker, 2011. "Intergenerational Transmission of Risk Attitudes: A Revealed Preference Approach," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 412, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  16. Boyle, Patricia A. & Yu, Lei & Buchman, Aron S. & Laibson, David I. & Bennett, David A., 2011. "Cognitive Function Is Associated with Risk Aversion in Community-Based Older Persons," Scholarly Articles 9938145, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  17. Liran Einav & Amy Finkelstein & Iuliana Pascu & Mark R. Cullen, 2012. "How General Are Risk Preferences? Choices under Uncertainty in Different Domains," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(6), pages 2606-38, October.
  18. Brown, Sarah & Dietrich, Michael & Ortiz-Nuñez, Aurora & Taylor, Karl, 2011. "Self-employment and attitudes towards risk: Timing and unobserved heterogeneity," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 425-433, June.

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