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The Impact of Research Grant Funding on Scientific Productivity

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  • Brian Jacob
  • Lars Lefgren

Abstract

In this paper, we estimate the impact of receiving an NIH grant on subsequent publications and citations. Our sample consists of all applications (unsuccessful as well as successful) to the NIH from 1980 to 2000 for postdoctoral training grants (F32s) and standard research grants (R01s). Both OLS and regression discontinuity estimates show that receipt of either an NIH postdoctoral fellowship or research grant leads to about one additional publication over the next five years. The estimates represent about 20 and 7 percent increases in research productivity for F32 and R01 recipients respectively. The limited research impact of NIH grants may be explained in part by a model in which the market for research funding is competitive, so that the loss of an NIH grant simply causes researchers to shift to another source of funding.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 13519.

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Date of creation: Oct 2007
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:13519

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  5. Brian A. Jacob & Lars Lefgren, 2004. "The Impact of Teacher Training on Student Achievement: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from School Reform Efforts in Chicago," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(1).
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Cited by:
  1. Hottenrott, Hanna & Lawson, Cornelia, 2013. "Fishing for complementarities: Competitive research funding and research productivity," ZEW Discussion Papers 13-113, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  2. Diego Ubfal & Alessandro Maffioli, 2010. "The Impact of Funding on Research Collaboration: Evidence from Argentina," IDB Publications 9395, Inter-American Development Bank.
  3. Pierre Azoulay & Joshua S. Graff Zivin & Gustavo Manso, 2009. "Incentives and Creativity: Evidence from the Academic Life Sciences," NBER Working Papers 15466, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Albert Banal-Estañol & Mireia Jofre-Bonet & Cornelia Lawson, 2013. "The Double-Edge Sword of Industry Collaboration: Evidence from Engineering Academics in the UK," Working Papers 491, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  5. Beaudry, Catherine & Allaoui, Sedki, 2012. "Impact of public and private research funding on scientific production: The case of nanotechnology," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(9), pages 1589-1606.
  6. Raphaël Godefroy, 2010. "The birth of the congressional clinic," PSE Working Papers halshs-00564921, HAL.
  7. Oliver Fabel & Miriam Hein & Robert Hofmeister, 2008. "Research Productivity in Business Economics: An Investigation of Austrian, German and Swiss Universities," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 9, pages 506-531, November.
  8. Jose Miguel Benavente & Gustavo Crespi & Lucas Figal Garone & Alessandro Maffioli, 2012. "The Impact of National Research Funds: A Regression Discontinuity Approach to the Chilean FONDECYT," Working Papers wp356, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
  9. Morten S. Henningsen & Torbjørn Hægeland & Jarle Møen, 2012. "Estimating the additionality of R&D subsidies using proposal evaluation data to control for firms’ R&D intentions," Discussion Papers 729, Research Department of Statistics Norway.
  10. Ubfal, Diego & Maffioli, Alessandro, 2011. "The impact of funding on research collaboration: Evidence from a developing country," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(9), pages 1269-1279.
  11. Sander Gerritsen & Karen van der Wiel & Erik Plug (UVA), 2013. "Up or out? How individual research grants affect academic careers in the Netherlands," CPB Discussion Paper 249, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  12. Gustavo A. Crespi & Alessandro Maffioli & Pierre Mohnen & Gonzalo Vázquez, 2011. "Evaluating the Impact of Science, Technology and Innovation Programs: a Methodological Toolkit," SPD Working Papers 1104, Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Strategic Planning and Development Effectiveness (SPD).

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