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Why Is the Timing of School Tracking So Heterogeneous?

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  • Ariga, Kenn

    ()
    (Kyoto University)

  • Brunello, Giorgio

    ()
    (University of Padova)

  • Iwahashi, Roki

    ()
    (University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa)

  • Rocco, Lorenzo

    ()
    (University of Padova)

Abstract

Secondary schools in the developed world differ in the degree of differentiation and in the first age of selection of pupils into different tracks. In this paper, we account for the heterogeneity of tracking time with a simple stochastic model which conjugates the returns from specialization with the costs of early selection. We calibrate the model for 20 countries – including most of Europe, the US and Japan – and show that the model performs rather well in replicating the observed heterogeneity, with the remarkable exception of Germany.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 1854.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1854

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Keywords: tracking; secondary schools;

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Cited by:
  1. Kenn Ariga & Giorgio Brunello & Roki Iwahashi & Lorenzo Rocco, 2006. "On the Efficiency Costs of Detracking Secondary Schools," Carlo Alberto Notebooks, Collegio Carlo Alberto 35, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
  2. Marisa Hidalgo-Hidalgo, 2011. "On the optimal allocation of students when peer effects are at work: tracking vs. mixing," SERIEs, Spanish Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 31-52, March.
  3. Daniele Checchi & Giorgio Brunello, 2006. "Does School Tracking Affect Equality of Opportunity? New International Evidence," UNIMI - Research Papers in Economics, Business, and Statistics, Universitá degli Studi di Milano unimi-1044, Universitá degli Studi di Milano.
  4. Volker Meier & Gabriela Schütz, 2007. "The Economics of Tracking and Non-Tracking," Ifo Working Paper Series Ifo Working Papers No. 50, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
  5. Andrea M. Mühlenweg, 2008. "Educational Effects of Alternative Secondary School Tracking Regimes in Germany," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 128(3), pages 351-379.
  6. Mühlenweg, Andrea Maria, 2007. "Educational Effects of Early or Later Secondary School Tracking in Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 07-079, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.

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