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Changing Diets in China's Cities: Empirical Fact or Urban Legend?

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  • Fengxia Dong
  • Frank H. Fuller

Abstract

China's economic reforms, which began in 1978, resulted in remarkable income growth, and urban Chinese consumers have responded by dramatically increasing their consumption of meat, other livestock products, and fruits and by decreasing consumption of grain-based foods. Economic prosperity, a growing openness to international markets, and domestic policy reforms have changed the food marketing environment for Chinese consumers and may have contributed to shifts in consumer preferences. The objective of this paper is to uncover evidence of structural change in food consumption among urban residents in China. Both parametric and nonparametric methods are used to test for structural change in aggregate household data from 1981 to 2004. The tests provided a reasonably clear picture of changing food consumption over the study period.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University in its series Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications with number 06-wp437.

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Date of creation: Sep 2007
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Handle: RePEc:ias:fpaper:06-wp437

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Related research

Keywords: China; demand models; food consumption; nonparametric analysis; parametric tests; structural change.;

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Cited by:
  1. Taylor, Richard D. & Koo, Won W., 2009. "Expected Changes in China's Grain and Oilseed Industries and Implications for the U.S. and World Agriculture," Agribusiness & Applied Economics Report 51991, North Dakota State University, Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics.
  2. Vardges Hovhannisyan & Brian W. Gould, 2011. "Quantifying the structure of food demand in China: An econometric approach," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 42, pages 1-18, November.
  3. Thornsbury, Suzanne & Woods, Mollie, 2007. "Background Information on the Chinese Fruit Sector," Staff Papers 9308, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  4. Hovhannisyan, Vardges & Gould, Brian W., 2010. "Quantifying the Structure of Food Demand in China Using a Generalized Quadratic AIDS Specification," 2010 Annual Meeting, February 6-9, 2010, Orlando, Florida 56422, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.

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