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Children's First Names and Immigration Background in France

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Author Info

  • Arai, Mahmood

    ()
    (Stockholm University Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS)

  • Besancenot, Damien

    ()
    (University of Paris 13)

  • Huynh, Kim

    ()
    (University of Paris 2)

  • Skalli, Ali

    ()
    (University of Paris 2)

Abstract

We present evidence indicating that immigrants and especially those from the Maghreb/Middle-East give first names to their children that are different from those given by the French majority population. When it comes to natives with an immigrant background, these differences are very little pronounced. Being born and raised up in France as well as being exposed to the French society and culture through residence, citizenship and the educational system draws individuals with or without immigrant background into similar ways of expressing belongings when choosing first names for their children, indicating the very strong assimilating forces in the French society.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Stockholm University Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS in its series SULCIS Working Papers with number 2009:6.

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Length: 10 pages
Date of creation: 26 May 2009
Date of revision:
Publication status: Forthcoming as Arai, Mahmood, Damien Besancenot, Kim Huynh and Ali Skalli, 'Children's First Names and Immigration Background in France' in International Migration .
Handle: RePEc:hhs:sulcis:2009_006

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Postal: Stockholm University Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS, Stockholm University, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden
Web page: http://www.su.se/sulcis
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Keywords: First names; Immigration;

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  1. Mahmood Arai & Peter Skogman Thoursie, 2009. "Renouncing Personal Names: An Empirical Examination of Surname Change and Earnings," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(1), pages 127-147, 01.
  2. Roland G. Fryer & Steven D. Levitt, 2004. "The Causes and Consequences of Distinctively Black Names," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 119(3), pages 767-805, August.
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Cited by:
  1. Alberto Bisin & Thierry Verdier, 2010. "The Economics of Cultural Transmission and Socialization," NBER Working Papers 16512, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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