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Intangible Investment and the Swedish Manufacturing and Service Sector Paradox

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  • Edquist, Harald

    ()
    (Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN))

Abstract

Since the mid 1990s labor productivity growth in Sweden has been high compared to Japan, the US and the western EU-countries. While productivity growth has been rapid in manufacturing, it has been much slower in the service sector. Paradoxically, all employment growth since the mid 1990s has been created in business services. The two traditional explanations of this pattern are Baumol’s disease and outsourcing. This paper puts forward an additional explanation, based on the observation that manufacturing industries have invested heavily in intangible assets such as R&D and vocational training. In 2005–2006, intangible investment was 25 percent of value added in manufacturing, while the corresponding figure for the service sector was 11 percent. Moreover, calculations based on the growth accounting framework at the industry level in 2000–2006 show that intangible investment accounted for almost 30 percent of labor productivity growth in manufacturing. Thus, investments in intangibles that mostly are knowledge intensive services have contributed considerable to productivity growth in Swedish manufacturing since 1995.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Research Institute of Industrial Economics in its series Working Paper Series with number 863.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: 11 Feb 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:iuiwop:0863

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Postal: Research Institute of Industrial Economics, Box 55665, SE-102 15 Stockholm, Sweden
Phone: +46 8 665 4500
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Keywords: Intangibles; Manufacturing; Productivity growth; Service sector; Sector analysis;

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References

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  1. Mauro Giorgio Marrano & Jonathan Haskel, 2006. "How Much Does the UK Invest in Intangible Assets?," Working Papers 578, Queen Mary, University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
  2. Kyoji Fukao & Tsutomu Miyagawa & Kentaro Mukai & Yukio Shinoda & Konomi Tonogi, 2009. "Intangible Investment In Japan: Measurement And Contribution To Economic Growth," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 55(3), pages 717-736, 09.
  3. Carol Corrado & Charles Hulten & Daniel Sichel, 2009. "Intangible Capital And U.S. Economic Growth," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 55(3), pages 661-685, 09.
  4. Clayton, Tony & Dal Borgo, Mariela & Haskel, Jonathan, 2009. "An Innovation Index Based on Knowledge Capital Investment: Definition and Results for the UK Market Sector," IZA Discussion Papers 4021, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Mauro Giorgio Marrano & Jonathan Haskel & Gavin Wallis, 2009. "What Happened To The Knowledge Economy? Ict, Intangible Investment, And Britain'S Productivity Record Revisited," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 55(3), pages 686-716, 09.
  6. Harald Edquist, 2011. "CAN INVESTMENT IN INTANGIBLES EXPLAIN THE SWEDISH PRODUCTIVITY BOOM IN THE 1990s?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 57(4), pages 658-682, December.
  7. Carol Corrado & Charles Hulten & Daniel Sichel, 2004. "Measuring capital and technology: an expanded framework," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2004-65, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  8. Haskel, J & Pesole, A & Galindo-Rueda, F, . "How much does the UK employ, spend and invest in design?," Working Papers 5971, Imperial College, London, Imperial College Business School.
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Cited by:
  1. Pardo Martínez, Clara Inés & Silveira, Semida, 2012. "Analysis of energy use and CO2 emission in service industries: Evidence from Sweden," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(7), pages 5285-5294.
  2. Estelle P. Dauchy, 2013. "The Efficiency Cost of Asset Taxation in the U.S. after Accounting for Intangible Assets," Working Papers w0199, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).

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