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Inequality and mobility analysis by the Hungarian Rotation Panel, 1993-98

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  • Zsuzsa Kapitany

    ()
    (Institute of Economics, Hungarian Acedemy of Sciences)

  • Gyorgy Molnar

    ()
    (Institute of Economics, Hungarian Acedemy of Sciences)

Abstract

We investigate the trends of inequalities and mobility of income, expenditure and stock of durables between 1993 and 1998 in Hungary. In 1996-8 the stagnating level of inequalities is coupled with relatively low and decreasing mobility. The relationship between inequalities and mobility fastens the relative positions of households, increasing the share of households unable to improve their positions on the short term. The impacts of the stabilisation shock in 1995 are shown with the help of the Hungarian Rotation Household Panel, a new dataset based on Household Budget Surveys. We give a detailed description of the Rotation Panel.

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File URL: http://econ.core.hu/doc/dp/dp/mtdp0204.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences in its series IEHAS Discussion Papers with number 0204.

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Length: 46 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:has:discpr:0204

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  1. Jarvis, Sarah & Jenkins, Stephen P, 1998. "How Much Income Mobility Is There in Britain?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(447), pages 428-43, March.
  2. Shorrocks, A F, 1982. "Inequality Decomposition by Factor Components," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(1), pages 193-211, January.
  3. Branko Milanovic, 1999. "Explaining the increase in inequality during transition," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 7(2), pages 299-341, July.
  4. Shorrocks, Anthony, 1978. "Income inequality and income mobility," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 376-393, December.
  5. Lokshin, Michael & Ravallion, Martin, 2000. "Short-lived shocks with long-lived impacts? - household income dynamics in a transition economy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2459, The World Bank.
  6. Pudney, Stephen, 1994. " Earnings Inequality in Hungary: A Comparative Analysis of Household and Enterprise Survey Data," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 27(3), pages 251-76.
  7. Redmond, Gerry & Kattuman, Paul, 2001. "Employment Polarisation and Inequality in the UK and Hungary," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(4), pages 467-80, July.
  8. Zsolt Spéder, 1998. "Poverty dynamics in Hungary during the transformation," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 6(1), pages 1-21, 05.
  9. Lokshin Michael & Ravallion Martin, 2004. "Household Income Dynamics in Two Transition Economies," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 8(3), pages 1-33, September.
  10. Atkinson,Anthony Barnes & Micklewright,John, 1992. "Economic Transformation in Eastern Europe and the Distribution of Income," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521438827, Fall.
  11. Shorrocks, A F, 1978. "The Measurement of Mobility," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(5), pages 1013-24, September.
  12. Fields, Gary S & Ok, Efe A, 1999. "Measuring Movement of Incomes," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 66(264), pages 455-71, November.
  13. Jenkins, Stephen P, 1995. "Accounting for Inequality Trends: Decomposition Analyses for the UK, 1971-86," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 62(245), pages 29-63, February.
  14. Shorrocks, Anthony F, 1984. "Inequality Decomposition by Population Subgroups," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(6), pages 1369-85, November.
  15. Collins, G. & Redmond, G., 1997. "Poverty in the UK and Hungary: Evidence from the Household Budget Survey," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9703, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
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