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Assimilation of Immigrants: Implications for Human Capital Accumulation of the Second Generation

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  • Slobodan Djajic

    ()
    (IUHEI)

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    Abstract

    Immigrants assimilate in various dimensions at different rates. Moreover, in each of these dimensions they assimilate at rates that may differ from those of their children. The purpose of this paper is to examine how the pace of assimilation of immigrants in various dimensions affects the rate of human capital accumulation of immigrant children. It is argued that rapid assimilation in certain dimensions serves to increase the rate of human capital accumulation of the second generation, while in other dimensions it may have the opposite effect.

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    File URL: http://repec.graduateinstitute.ch/pdfs/Working_papers/HEIWP01-2004.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies in its series IHEID Working Papers with number 01-2004.

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    Length: 31
    Date of creation: 03 Feb 2004
    Date of revision:
    Publication status: Published in Journal of Population Economics, Volume 16, 2003, pages 831-845
    Handle: RePEc:gii:giihei:heiwp01-2004

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    Keywords: Assimilation; Immigrants; Human Capital.;

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    1. Mary Corcoran & Roger Gordon & Deborah Laren & Gary Solon, 1992. "The Association between Men's Economic Status and Their Family and Community Origins," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 27(4), pages 575-601.
    2. George J. Borjas, 1991. "Ethnic Capital and Intergenerational Mobility," NBER Working Papers 3788, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Chiswick, Barry R, 1978. "The Effect of Americanization on the Earnings of Foreign-born Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 897-921, October.
    4. Bauer, Thomas K. & Lofstrom, Magnus & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2000. "Immigration Policy, Assimilation of Immigrants and Natives' Sentiments towards Immigrants: Evidence from 12 OECD-Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 187, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Borjas, George J, 1995. "Ethnicity, Neighborhoods, and Human-Capital Externalities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 365-90, June.
    6. Dustmann, Christian, 1994. "Speaking Fluency, Writing Fluency and Earnings of Migrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 133-56.
    7. Barry Chiswick & Paul Miller, 2001. "A model of destination-language acquisition: Application to male immigrants in Canada," Demography, Springer, vol. 38(3), pages 391-409, August.
    8. Barry R. Chiswick, 2000. "A Model of Immigrant Language Acquisition: Application to Male Immigrants in Canada," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 149, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
    9. Chiswick, Barry R. & Miller, Paul W., 2002. "Do Enclaves Matter in Immigrant Adjustment?," IZA Discussion Papers 449, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Paul W. Miller & Barry R. Chiswick, 1999. "Language skills and earnings among legalized aliens," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 63-89.
    11. Dustmann, C, 1993. "Earnings Adjustment of Temporary Migrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 153-68, May.
    12. Chiswick, Barry R, 1991. "Speaking, Reading, and Earnings among Low-Skilled Immigrants," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(2), pages 149-70, April.
    13. Chiswick, Barry R & Miller, Paul W, 1995. "The Endogeneity between Language and Earnings: International Analyses," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(2), pages 246-88, April.
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