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Sources of Fluctuations in Relative Prices: Evidence from High Inflation Countries

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Author Info

  • Rogers, J.H.
  • Wang, P.

Abstract

Casual analysis of six high-inflation episodes indicates a strong positive relationship between movements in the relative price ratio, measured by (WPI/CPI), and the inflation rate. The authors estimate a vector autoregression model in which relative price movements are driven by several fundamental disturbances (fiscal, monetary, output, and exchange rate), identified using only long-run restrictions based on a general-equilibrium optimizing model. Analysis of the endogenous response of relative price changes to these disturbances suggests that output and monetary shocks are the most important driving forces, although fiscal and exchange rate shocks are also influential in explaining relative price movements in some countries. Copyright 1993 by MIT Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics in its series Papers with number 12-90-2.

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Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: 1990
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:pensta:12-90-2

Contact details of provider:
Postal: PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS, UNIVERSITY PARK PENNSYLVANIA 16802 U.S.A.
Phone: (814)865-1456
Fax: (814)863-4775
Web page: http://econ.la.psu.edu/
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Keywords: inflation ; consumption ; prices;

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Cited by:
  1. Ostermark, Ralf, 2001. "Multivariate cointegration analysis of the Finnish-Japanese stock markets," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 134(3), pages 498-507, November.
  2. Ellis W. Tallman & De-piao Tang & Ping Wang, 2001. "Anticipated Inflation, Real Disturbances and Money Demand: The Case of Chinese Hyperinflation, 1946-49," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0134, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics, revised Dec 2001.
  3. Abul M. M. Masih & Rumi Masih, 1997. "Bivariate and Multivariate Tests of Money-Price Causality: Robust Evidence from a Small Developing Country," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(6), pages 803-825.
  4. Jon Faust & Eric M. Leeper, 1994. "When do long-run identifying restrictions give reliable results?," International Finance Discussion Papers 462, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  5. Ellis W. Tallman & De-piao Tang & Ping Wang, 2002. "Nominal and real disturbances and money demand in the Chinese hyperinflation," Working Paper 2002-4, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  6. Christian Broda, 2002. "Terms of trade and exchange rate regimes in developing countries," Staff Reports 148, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  7. Masih, Rumi & Masih, Abul M. M., 1996. "Macroeconomic activity dynamics and Granger causality: New evidence from a small developing economy based on a vector error-correction modelling analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 407-426, July.
  8. Sailesh K. Jha & Ping Wang & Chong K.Yip, 2000. "Dynamics in a Transactions-Based Monetary Growth Model," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0005, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
  9. John H. Rogers, 1995. "Real shocks and real exchange rates in really long-term data," International Finance Discussion Papers 493, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  10. Masih, Abul M. M. & Masih, Rumi, 1996. "Empirical tests to discern the dynamic causal chain in macroeconomic activity: new evidence from Thailand and Malaysia based on a multivariate cointegration/vector error-correction modeling approach," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 531-560, October.
  11. Ping Wang & Danyang Xie, 2013. "Real Effects of Money Growth and Optimal Rate of Inflation in a Cash‐in‐Advance Economy with Labor‐Market Frictions," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 45(8), pages 1517-1546, December.
  12. Broda, Christian, 2004. "Terms of trade and exchange rate regimes in developing countries," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 31-58, May.
  13. Derek Laing & Victor E. Li & Ping Wang, 1998. "Inflation and economic activity in a multiple matching model of money," Working Papers 1998-018, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  14. Masih, A. Mansur M. & Masih, Rumi, 2002. "Propagative causal price transmission among international stock markets: evidence from the pre- and postglobalization period," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 63-91.
  15. Masih, Abul M. M. & Masih, Rumi, 1997. "Dynamic linkages and the propagation mechanism driving major international stock markets: An analysis of the pre- and post-crash eras," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 859-885.
  16. Derek Laing & Victor E. Li & Ping Wang, 2000. "Inflation, trade frictions, and productive activity in a multiple-matching model of money," Working Paper 2000-28, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

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