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High frequency data, frequency domain inference and volatility forecasting

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Author Info

  • Jonathan H. Wright
  • Tim Bollerslev

Abstract

While it is clear that the volatility of asset returns is serially correlated, there is no general agreement as to the most appropriate parametric model for characterizing this temporal dependence. In this paper, we propose a simple way of modeling financial market volatility using high frequency data. The method avoids using a tight parametric model, by instead simply fitting a long autoregression to log-squared, squared or absolute high frequency returns. This can either be estimated by the usual time domain method, or alternatively the autoregressive coefficients can be backed out from the smoothed periodogram estimate of the spectrum of log-squared, squared or absolute returns. We show how this approach can be used to construct volatility forecasts, which compare favorably with some leading alternatives in an out-of-sample forecasting exercise.

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File URL: http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/ifdp/1999/649/default.htm
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File URL: http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/ifdp/1999/649/ifdp649.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.) in its series International Finance Discussion Papers with number 649.

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Date of creation: 1999
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgif:649

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Keywords: Financial markets ; Forecasting;

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References

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  1. Breidt, F. Jay & Crato, Nuno & de Lima, Pedro, 1998. "The detection and estimation of long memory in stochastic volatility," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 83(1-2), pages 325-348.
  2. Bollerslev, Tim & Engle, Robert F. & Nelson, Daniel B., 1986. "Arch models," Handbook of Econometrics, in: R. F. Engle & D. McFadden (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 49, pages 2959-3038 Elsevier.
  3. Bollerslev, Tim & Chou, Ray Y. & Kroner, Kenneth F., 1992. "ARCH modeling in finance : A review of the theory and empirical evidence," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1-2), pages 5-59.
  4. Jorion, Philippe, 1995. " Predicting Volatility in the Foreign Exchange Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 50(2), pages 507-28, June.
  5. Gallant, A Ronald & Rossi, Peter E & Tauchen, George, 1992. "Stock Prices and Volume," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 5(2), pages 199-242.
  6. Francis X. Diebold & Jose A. Lopez, 1995. "Modeling volatility dynamics," Research Paper 9522, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  7. Tim Bollerslev, 1986. "Generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity," EERI Research Paper Series EERI RP 1986/01, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
  8. Muller, Ulrich A. & Dacorogna, Michel M. & Olsen, Richard B. & Pictet, Olivier V. & Schwarz, Matthias & Morgenegg, Claude, 1990. "Statistical study of foreign exchange rates, empirical evidence of a price change scaling law, and intraday analysis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 14(6), pages 1189-1208, December.
  9. Andersen, Torben G. & Bollerslev, Tim, 1997. "Intraday periodicity and volatility persistence in financial markets," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 4(2-3), pages 115-158, June.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Eric Ghysels & Pedro Santa-Clara & Rossen Valkanov, 2004. "Predicting Volatility: Getting the Most out of Return Data Sampled at Different Frequencies," NBER Working Papers 10914, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Suhejla Hoiti & Esfandiar Maasoumi & Michael McAleer & Daniel Slottje, 2005. "Measuring the Volatility in U.S. Treasury Benchmarks and Debt Instruments," DEA Working Papers 14, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Departament d'Economía Aplicada.
  3. Kang, Sang Hoon & Cheong, Chongcheul & Yoon, Seong-Min, 2010. "Long memory volatility in Chinese stock markets," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 389(7), pages 1425-1433.
  4. Gil-Alana, Luis A. & Shittu, Olanrewaju I. & Yaya, OlaOluwa S., 2014. "On the persistence and volatility in European, American and Asian stocks bull and bear markets," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 149-162.
  5. Thomas C. Chiang & Jiandong Li, 2012. "Stock Returns and Risk: Evidence from Quantile," Journal of Risk and Financial Management, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(1), pages 20-58, December.
  6. Chun-Hung Chen & Wei-Choun Yu & Eric Zivot, 2009. "Predicting Stock Volatility Using After-Hours Information," Working Papers UWEC-2009-01, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
  7. Carmen Broto & Esther Ruiz, 2004. "Estimation methods for stochastic volatility models: a survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(5), pages 613-649, December.
  8. Patton, Andrew J., 2011. "Volatility forecast comparison using imperfect volatility proxies," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 160(1), pages 246-256, January.
  9. Sévi, Benoît, 2014. "Forecasting the volatility of crude oil futures using intraday data," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 235(3), pages 643-659.
  10. Luisa Bisaglia & Silvano Bordignon & Francesco Lisi, 2003. "k -Factor GARMA models for intraday volatility forecasting," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(4), pages 251-254.
  11. Benoît Sévi, 2014. "Forecasting the volatility of crude oil futures using intraday data," Working Papers 2014-053, Department of Research, Ipag Business School.
  12. Chen, Chun-Hung & Yu, Wei-Choun & Zivot, Eric, 2012. "Predicting stock volatility using after-hours information: Evidence from the NASDAQ actively traded stocks," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 366-383.

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