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Policy-relevant Assessment Method of Socio-economic Impacts of Floods: An Italian Case Study

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Author Info

  • Fabio Farinosi

    (Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei, Euro-Mediterranean Center for Climate Change, “Ca’ Foscari” University)

  • Lorenzo Carrera

    (Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei, “Ca’ Foscari” University, Italy)

  • Alexandros Maziotis

    (Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei, Euro-Mediterranean Center for Climate Change)

  • Jaroslav Mysiak

    (Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei, Euro-Mediterranean Center for Climate Change)

  • Fabio Eboli

    (Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei, Euro-Mediterranean Center for Climate Change)

  • Gabriele Standardi

    (Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei, Euro-Mediterranean Center for Climate Change, Italy)

Abstract

This paper estimates the direct and indirect socio-economic impacts of the 2000 flood that took place in the Po river basin (Italy) using a combination of Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model and Spatial and Multi-Criteria Analysis. A risk map for the whole basin is generated as a function of hazard, exposure and vulnerability. The indirect economic losses are assessed using the CGE model, whereas the direct social and economic impacts are estimated with spatial analysis tools combined with Multi-Criteria Analysis. The social impact is expressed as a function of physical characteristics of the extreme event, social vulnerability and adaptive capacity. The results indicate that the highest risk areas are located in the mountainous and in the most populated portions of the basin, which are consistent with the high values of hazard and vulnerability. Considerably economic damages occurred to the critical infrastructure of all the sectors with the industry/commercial sector having the biggest impact. A negative variation in the country and industry Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was also reported. Our study is of great interest to those who are interested in estimating the economic impact of flood events. It can also assist decision makers in pinpointing factors that threaten the sustainability and stability of a risk-prone area and more specifically, to help them understand how to reduce social vulnerability to flood events.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei in its series Working Papers with number 2012.87.

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Date of creation: Nov 2012
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Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2012.87

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Keywords: Risk Assessment; Flood; Economic Impacts; Social Impact; Impact Assessment;

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  1. Pauw, Karl & Thurlow, James & Bachu, Murthy & Van Seventer, Dirk Ernst, 2011. "The economic costs of extreme weather events: a hydrometeorological CGE analysis for Malawi," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(02), pages 177-198, April.
  2. Susan L. Cutter & Bryan J. Boruff & W. Lynn Shirley, 2003. "Social Vulnerability to Environmental Hazards," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 84(2), pages 242-261.
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Cited by:
  1. Francesco Bosello & Enrica De Cian, 2013. "Climate Change, Sea Level Rise, and Coastal Disasters. A Review of Modeling Practices," Working Papers 2013.104, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.

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