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Credit Cycles

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  • John Moore
  • Nobuhiro Kiyotaki

Abstract

The authors construct a model of a dynamic economy in which lenders cannot force borrowers to repay their debts unless the debts are secured. In such an economy, durable assets play a dual role: not only are they factors of production but they also serve as collateral for loans. The dynamic interaction between credit limits and asset prices turns out to be a powerful transmission mechanism by which the effects of shocks persist, amplify, and spill over to other sectors. The authors show that small, temporary shocks to technology or income distribution can generate large, persistent fluctuations in output and asset prices. Copyright 1997 by the University of Chicago.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh in its series Discussion Papers with number 1995-5.

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Handle: RePEc:edn:ediedp:1995-5

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  1. Hart, O. & Moore, J., 1991. "A Theory of Debt Based on the Inalienability of Human Capital," Working papers 592, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  2. Hart, O. & Moore, J., 1989. "Default And Renegotiation: A Dynamic Model Of Debt," Working papers 520, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  3. Bernanke, Ben S, 1983. "Nonmonetary Effects of the Financial Crisis in Propagation of the Great Depression," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(3), pages 257-76, June.
  4. Bernanke, Ben & Gertler, Mark, 1989. "Agency Costs, Net Worth, and Business Fluctuations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(1), pages 14-31, March.
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As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Sunspots and Credit Frictions
    by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2010-01-25 03:20:38
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