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Occupationa Pensions, Wages And Tenure Wage Profiles

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  • Vincenzo Andrietti

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  • Eleonora Patacchini

    ()

Abstract

Using data from the BHPS, we estimate the impact of occupational pensions on wages and on the tenure profile of wages of male private sector workers in the UK. According to the theoretical literature, occupational pensions participants should receive a premium at the beginning of their careers, when the financial quit disincentives stemming from defined benefit plans are less binding. Our empirical evidence is consistent with this prediction. We find that occupational pension participants earn a positive wage premium only at the beginning of the career. Once we account for the endogenous sorting of individuals into occupational pension schemes, the magnitude of the estimated premium decreases sharply and it looses statistical significance. Indeed, the wage premium appears to be completely explained by unobservable individual and job match heterogeneity.

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Paper provided by Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía in its series Economics Working Papers with number we043612.

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Date of creation: Jun 2004
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Handle: RePEc:cte:werepe:we043612

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  1. Edward B. Montgomery & Kathryn Shaw & Mary Ellen Benedict, 1990. "Pensions and Wages: An Hedonic Price Theory Approach," NBER Working Papers 3458, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Joseph G. Altonji & Robert A. Shakotko, 1985. "Do Wages Rise With Job Seniority?," NBER Working Papers 1616, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Finnie, R., 1993. "Tenure Experience, and Men's and Women's Wages: Panel Estimates from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth," Papers 9305, Laval - Recherche en Politique Economique.
  4. Griliches, Zvi & Hausman, Jerry A., 1986. "Errors in variables in panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 93-118, February.
  5. Dustmann, Christian & Pereira, Sonia C., 2005. "Wage Growth and Job Mobility in the U.K. and Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 1586, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Akerlof, George A & Katz, Lawrence F, 1989. "Workers' Trust Funds and the Logic of Wage Profiles," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 104(3), pages 525-36, August.
  7. Richard Disney & Carl Emmerson, 2002. "Choice of pension scheme and job mobility in Britain," IFS Working Papers W02/09, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  8. Steven G. Allen & Robert L. Clark & Ann A. McDermed, 1993. "Pensions, Bonding, and Lifetime Jobs," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(3), pages 463-481.
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