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Technology Usage in U.S. Manufacturing Industries: New Evidence from the Survey of Manufacturing Technology

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  • Timothy Dunne

Abstract

Using a new dataset on technology usage in U.S. manufacturing plants, this paper describes how technology usage varies by plant and firm characteristics. The paper extends the previous literature in three important ways. First, it examines a wide range of relatively new technologies. Second, the paper uses a much larger and more representative set of firms and establishments than previous studies. Finally, the paper explores the role of firm R&D expenditures in the process of technology adoption. The main findings indicate that larger plants more readily use new technologies, plants owned by firms with high R&D-to-sales ratios adopt technologies more rapidly, and the relationship between plant age and technology usage is relatively weak.

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File URL: ftp://ftp2.census.gov/ces/wp/1991/CES-WP-91-07.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau in its series Working Papers with number 91-7.

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Date of creation: Oct 1991
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cen:wpaper:91-7

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Keywords: CES; economic; research; micro; data; microdata; chief; economist;

References

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  1. Dunne, Timothy & Roberts, Mark J & Samuelson, Larry, 1989. "The Growth and Failure of U.S. Manufacturing Plants," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 104(4), pages 671-98, November.
  2. Cohen, Wesley M. & Levin, Richard C., 1989. "Empirical studies of innovation and market structure," Handbook of Industrial Organization, in: R. Schmalensee & R. Willig (ed.), Handbook of Industrial Organization, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 18, pages 1059-1107 Elsevier.
  3. Cohen, Wesley M & Levinthal, Daniel A, 1989. "Innovation and Learning: The Two Faces of R&D," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(397), pages 569-96, September.
  4. Acs, Zoltan J & Audretsch, David B, 1988. "Innovation in Large and Small Firms: An Empirical Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(4), pages 678-90, September.
  5. Evans, David S, 1987. "Tests of Alternative Theories of Firm Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(4), pages 657-74, August.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Maliranta, Mika, 1998. "Factors of Productivity Performance by Plant Generation:Some findings from Finnish manufacturing," Discussion Papers 634, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
  2. Sakellaris, Plutarchos & Wilson, Daniel J., 2002. "Quantifying embodied technological change," Working Paper Series 0158, European Central Bank.
  3. Plutarchos Sakellaris & Daniel J. Wilson, 2001. "The production-side approach to estimating embodied technological change," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2001-20, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  4. Joe Mattey, 1993. "Evidence on IO Technology Assumptions From the Longitudinal Research Database," Working Papers 93-8, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  5. Robert H Mcguckin, 1992. "Analytic Use Of Economic Microdata; A Model For Researcher Access With Confidentiality Protection," Working Papers 92-8, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  6. Baldwin, John R. & Diverty, Brent, 1995. "Utilisation des technologies de pointe dans les etablissements de fabrication," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 1995085f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
  7. Mark E Doms, 1993. "Energy Intensity, Electricity Consumption, and Advanced Manufacturing Technology Usage," Working Papers 93-9, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  8. Baldwin, John R. & Diverty, Brent, 1995. "Advanced Technology Use in Canadian Manufacturing Establishments," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1995085e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  9. Robert H Mcguckin, 1993. "The Importance of Establishment Data in Economic Research," Working Papers 93-10, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.

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  1. Industrial Sociology (FCT-UNL)

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