Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

A Reconsideration of the Empirical Evidence on the Asymmetric Effects of Money-supply shocks: Positive vs. Negative or Big vs. Small

Contents:

Author Info

  • Morten Ravn
  • Martin Sola

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Download Info

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Birkbeck, Department of Economics, Mathematics & Statistics in its series Archive Discussion Papers with number 9606.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 1996
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bbk:bbkewp:9606

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX, UK
Phone: 44-20- 76316429
Fax: 44-20- 76316416
Web page: http://www.ems.bbk.ac.uk/

Order Information:
Email:

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Randall E. Parker & Philip Rothman, 2004. "An Examination of the Asymmetric Effects of Money Supply Shocks in the Pre--World War I and Interwar Periods," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 42(1), pages 88-100, January.
  2. Fabio ALESSANDRINI, 2003. "Some Additional Evidence from the Credit Channel on the Response to Monetary Shocks: Looking for Asymmetries," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 03.04, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
  3. Simon Hall & Mark Walsh & Anthony Yates, 1997. "How do UK companies set prices?," Bank of England working papers 67, Bank of England.
  4. Jui-Chuan (Della) Chang & Dennis W. Jansen, 2005. "The Effect of Monetary Policy on Bank Lending and Aggregate Output: Asymmetries from Nonlinearities in the Lending Channel," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 6(1), pages 129-153, May.
  5. John Bennett & Manfredi M. A. La Manna, 2001. "Reversing the Keynesian Asymmetry," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1556-1563, December.
  6. Saki Bigio & Jorge Salas, 2006. "Non-Linear Effects of Monetary Policy and Real Exchange Rate Shocks in Partially Dollarized Economies: An Empirical Study for Peru," Working Papers 2006-008, Banco Central de Reserva del Perú.
  7. Abdulnasser Hatemi-J & Manuchehr Irandoust, 2006. "A bootstrap-corrected causality test: another look at the money–income relationship," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 207-216, March.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bbk:bbkewp:9606. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ().

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.