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Tax Burden in Jamaica

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Abstract

The Government of Jamaica imposes a wide range of taxes on income, consumption, and property. An important consideration in any reform of these taxes is their impact of the distribution of income, or their tax burden. This staff paper presents background and analysis of the burden of the existing system of taxes. The question of “who bears the final burden of a tax?” is a fundamental one. Any tax will cause individuals and firms to change their behaviors, and the resulting changes in product and factor prices will affect the “incidence”, or the distributional effects, of the tax. Economists have devoted much attention to the question of tax incidence. Although there is wide agreement about the incidence of some taxes, such as excise or individual income taxes, the incidence of other taxes remains controversial. Even so, several basic “principles” of tax incidence should be kept in mind.

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File URL: http://icepp.gsu.edu/sites/default/files/documents/icepp/wp/ispwp0434.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University in its series International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU with number paper0434.

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Length: 91 pages
Date of creation: 01 Dec 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ays:ispwps:paper0434

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Keywords: Jamaica; Tax Burden;

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References

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  1. Bird, Richard M & Miller, Barbara Diane, 1989. "The Incidence of Indirect Taxes on Low-Income Households in Jamaica," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 37(2), pages 393-409, January.
  2. Kelly D. Edmiston & Richard M. Bird, 2004. "Taxing Consumption in Jamaica:The GCT and the SCT," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0432, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  3. Felix Rioja & Keith E. Maskus, 2004. "Taxation Issues in The Jamaican External Trade Sector," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0429, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  4. Mark Rider, 2004. "Corporate Income Tax and Tax Incentives," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0428, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  5. Sally Wallace & James Alm, 2004. "The Jamaican Individual Income Tax," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0430, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  6. David L. Sjoquist, 2005. "The Land Value Tax in Jamaica: An Analysis and Options for Reform," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0511, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  7. Chen, Shaohua & Datt, Gaurav & Ravallion, Martin, 1994. "Is Poverty Increasing in the Developing World?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 40(4), pages 359-76, December.
  8. Roy Bahl, 2004. "Property Transfer Tax and Stamp Duty," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0427, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Umir Wahid & Sally Wallace, 2008. "Incidence of Taxes in Pakistan: Primer and Estimates," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0813, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  2. Sally Wallace & James Alm, 2004. "The Jamaican Individual Income Tax," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0430, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  3. Nora Lustig & Carola Pessino & George Gray Molina & Wilson Jimenez & Veronica Paz & Ernesto Yanez & Claudiney Pereira & Sean Higgins & John Scott & Miguel Jaramillo, 2011. "Fiscal Policy and Income Redistribution in Latin America: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom," Working Papers 1124, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
  4. Roy Bahl & Sally Wallace, 2007. "From Income Tax to Consumption Tax?. The Case of Jamaica," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 63(3), pages 396-414, September.
  5. James Alm & Edward Sennoga & Mark Skidmore, 2005. "Perfect Competition, Spatial Competition, and Tax Incidence in the Retail Gasoline Market," Working Papers 05-09, UW-Whitewater, Department of Economics.

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