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The Evolution Of China'S Rural Labor Markets During The Reforms

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Author Info

  • de Brauw, Alan
  • Huang, Jikun
  • Rozelle, Scott
  • Zhang, Linxiu
  • Zhang, Yigang

Abstract

This paper contributes to the assessment of China'’s rural labor markets, while paying attention to whether these markets are developing in a manner conducive to the nation’s modernization. According to our household survey, we find that the rapid increase in off-farm employment has continued and accelerated during the late 1990s. Our analysis shows that migration has become the most prevalent off-farm activity; has become dominated by young and better educated workers; expanded most rapidly in areas that are relatively well-off; and begun to draw workers from portions of the population, such as women, that earlier had been excluded from participation.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/11984
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics in its series Working Papers with number 11984.

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Date of creation: 2002
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Handle: RePEc:ags:ucdavw:11984

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Keywords: Labor and Human Capital;

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  1. Benjamin, Dwayne & Brandt, Loren, 1997. "Land, Factor Markets, and Inequality in Rural China: Historical Evidence," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 460-494, October.
  2. Dennis Tao Yang & Hao Zhou, 1999. "Rural-urban disparity and sectoral labour allocation in China," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(3), pages 105-133.
  3. Maurer-Fazio, Margaret, 1999. "Earnings and education in China's transition to a market economy Survey evidence from 1989 and 1992," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 17-40.
  4. Shouying Liu & MICHAEL R. CARTER & Yang Yao, 1996. "Dimensions and Diversity of Property Rights in Rural China: Delimmas on the Road to Further Reform," Wisconsin-Madison Agricultural and Applied Economics Staff Papers 395, Wisconsin-Madison Agricultural and Applied Economics Department.
  5. Zhang, Linxiu & Huang, Jikun & Rozelle, Scott, 2002. "Employment, emerging labor markets, and the role of education in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(2-3), pages 313-328.
  6. Dwight H. Perkins, 1994. "Completing China's Move to the Market," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(2), pages 23-46, Spring.
  7. William L. Parish & Xiaoye Zhe & Fang Li, . "Nonfarm Work and Marketization of the Chinese Countryside," University of Chicago - Population Research Center 95-6, Chicago - Population Research Center.
  8. Putterman, Louis, 1992. "Dualism and Reform in China," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 40(3), pages 467-93, April.
  9. Stark O, 1976. "Rural-to-urban migration and some economic issues: a review utilising findings of surveys and empirical studies covering the 1965-1975 period," ILO Working Papers 166637, International Labour Organization.
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