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Causes of health inequalities in Uganda: Evidence from the demographic and health surveys

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  • Ssewanyana, Sarah
  • Kasirye, Ibrahim

Abstract

Despite sustained macroeconomic growth and impressive income poverty reduction in Uganda, the country’s total child nutrition status remains poor. More so, wide within country disparities in stunting and underweight rates exist across the country. This study exploredthe determinants of child nutrition status and in Uganda using three rounds of the Uganda demographic and health surveys undertaken during 1995–2006.The surveys are nationally representative and capture anthropometric indicators for children aged below 5 years. The study investigated the determinants of health inequalities focusing on child health status through a combination of decomposition and regression analysis. Our results show that household welfare status remains a key determinant of child health status and inequalities in health. Furthermore, the results show that individual maternal education matters more in enhancing child health than does community knowledge about health.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC) in its series Research Series with number 148951.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:ags:eprcrs:148951

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Keywords: Health; EPRC; Ssewanyana; Poverty reduction; Child nutrition; maternal education; welfare; Community/Rural/Urban Development; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Food Security and Poverty; Health Economics and Policy;

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  1. David Lawson & Simon Appleton, 2007. "Child Health in Uganda: Policy Determinants and Measurement," European Journal of Development Research, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 19(2), pages 210-233.
  2. Schipper, Youdi & Hoogeveen, Johannes G., 2005. "Which inequality matters? Growth evidence based on small area welfare estimates in Uganda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3592, The World Bank.
  3. Sarah Ssewanyana & Stephen D. Younger, 2008. "Infant Mortality in Uganda: Determinants, Trends and the Millennium Development Goals," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 17(1), pages 34-61, January.
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