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Price Behavior In Emerging Stock Markets: Cases Of Poland And Slovakia

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  • Hranaiova, Jana
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    Abstract

    This paper analyzes serial correlation in stock returns, and informational role of volume and volatility in Polish and Slovakian stock markets. Results indicate that prices tend to overshoot to new information in the Slovakian market, while new information gets impounded into prices with a one-day lag in the Polish market. In the context of feedback trading models, the Slovakian stock market seems to be dominated by traders who sell high and buy low, while stop-loss or distress selling type traders prevail in the Polish market. Traders became more sophisticated over time, as market efficiencies increased. Informational role of volume and volatility appears to be consistent with that found in developed stock markets.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/7225
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management in its series Working Papers with number 7225.

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    Date of creation: 1999
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:cudawp:7225

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    Keywords: Financial Economics;

    References

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    1. Schwert, G William, 1989. " Why Does Stock Market Volatility Change over Time?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 44(5), pages 1115-53, December.
    2. Sentana, Enrique & Wadhwani, Sushil B, 1992. "Feedback Traders and Stock Return Autocorrelations: Evidence from a Century of Daily Data," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 102(411), pages 415-25, March.
    3. LeBaron, Blake, 1992. "Some Relations between Volatility and Serial Correlations in Stock Market Returns," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65(2), pages 199-219, April.
    4. Karpoff, Jonathan M., 1987. "The Relation between Price Changes and Trading Volume: A Survey," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 22(01), pages 109-126, March.
    5. Sanford J Grossman & Joseph E Stiglitz, 1997. "On the Impossibility of Informationally Efficient Markets," Levine's Working Paper Archive 1908, David K. Levine.
    6. Gallant, A Ronald & Rossi, Peter E & Tauchen, George, 1992. "Stock Prices and Volume," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 5(2), pages 199-242.
    7. Morse, Dale, 1980. "Asymmetrical Information in Securities Markets and Trading Volume," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(05), pages 1129-1148, December.
    8. Harris, Lawrence, 1986. "Cross-Security Tests of the Mixture of Distributions Hypothesis," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 21(01), pages 39-46, March.
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