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Rethinking The Technical Efficiency Of Small Scale Yam Farmers In Nigeria Using Conventional And Non-Conventional Inefficiency Parameters

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  • Nmadu, Job N.
  • Simpa, James O.
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    Abstract

    The study investigated whether socio-cultural factors accentuate technical efficiency of yam farmers in Kogi State, Nigeria in addition to the socio-economic normally postulated. Primary data collected from 180 yam farmers randomly selected from three local government areas, one from each of the socio-cultural group of the State was used. Results indicated that there is more number of socio-cultural factors that determine the level of technical efficiency of yam farmers than the socio-economic. The results further show that male farmers are more affected by socio-cultural factors than female. In addition, the Okuns seems to be more affected while the Igalas were least affected. However, some of the socio-cultural practices are shrouded in some form of secrecy and research effort should be geared towards empirical understanding of their operation. Yam farmers should be provided with more comprehensive and adequate extension support to manage their farms in line with modern and improved production technologies, rather than basing their production decisions on factors alien to modern agricultural production.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society in its series 2014 Conference (58th), February 4-7, 2014, Port Maquarie, Australia with number 165866.

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    Date of creation: 2014
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:aare14:165866

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    Keywords: Yam farmers; socio-economic; socio-cultural; technical efficiency; modern agricultural production; Crop Production/Industries; Productivity Analysis;

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    1. Drew Fudenberg & David K. Levine, 2006. "Superstition and Rational Learning," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 2114, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    2. Rahman, Sanzidur, 2003. "Profit Efficiency Among Bangladeshi Rice Farmers," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25898, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Bénabou, Roland & Tirole, Jean, 2007. "Identity, Dignity and Taboos: Beliefs as Assets," CEPR Discussion Papers 6123, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Battese, George E. & Coelli, Tim J., 1988. "Prediction of firm-level technical efficiencies with a generalized frontier production function and panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 387-399, July.
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