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Crime Displacement and Police Interventions: Evidence from London’s “Operation Theseus”

In: The Economics of Crime: Lessons for and from Latin America

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  • Mirko Draca
  • Stephen Machin
  • Robert Witt

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This chapter was published in:

  • Rafael Di Tella & Sebastian Edwards & Ernesto Schargrodsky, 2010. "The Economics of Crime: Lessons for and from Latin America," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number dite09-1, May.
    This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 11849.

    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:11849

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    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Jacob, Brian A. & Lefgren, Lars & Moretti, Enrico, 2005. "The Dynamics of Criminal Behavior: Evidence from Weather Shocks," Working Paper Series rwp05-003, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    2. Stephen Machin & Olivier Marie, 2011. "Crime And Police Resources: The Street Crime Initiative," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 678-701, 08.
    3. Mirko Draca & Stephen Machin & Robert Witt, 2008. "Panic on the Streets of London: Police, Crime and the July 2005 Terror Attacks," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0308, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    4. Steven D. Levitt, 1995. "Using Electoral Cycles in Police Hiring to Estimate the Effect of Policeon Crime," NBER Working Papers 4991, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Steven D. Levitt, 2004. "Understanding Why Crime Fell in the 1990s: Four Factors that Explain the Decline and Six that Do Not," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(1), pages 163-190, Winter.
    6. Steven D. Levitt, 2002. "Using Electoral Cycles in Police Hiring to Estimate the Effects of Police on Crime: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 1244-1250, September.
    7. Rafael Di Tella & Ernesto Schargrodsky, 2004. "Do Police Reduce Crime? Estimates Using the Allocation of Police Forces After a Terrorist Attack," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 115-133, March.
    8. Klick, Jonathan & Tabarrok, Alexander, 2005. "Using Terror Alert Levels to Estimate the Effect of Police on Crime," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 48(1), pages 267-79, April.
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    Cited by:
    1. Mirko Draca & Steve Machin & Robert Witt, 2008. "Panic on the streets of London: police, crime and the July 2005 terror attacks," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19632, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Daniel Montolio & Simón Planells-Struse, 2013. "When police patrols matter. The effect of police proximity on citizens? crime risk perception," ERSA conference papers ersa13p846, European Regional Science Association.

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