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Market Microstructure

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  • Spulber,Daniel F.

Abstract

This book presents a theory of the firm based on its economic role as an intermediary between customers and suppliers. Professor Spulber demonstrates how the intermediation theory of the firm explains firm formation by showing how they arise in a market equilibrium. In addition, the theory helps explain how markets work by showing how firms select market-clearing prices. Models of intermediation and market microstructure from microeconomics and finance shed considerable light on the formation and market-making activities of firms. The intermediation theory of the firm is compared to existing economic theories of the firm including the neoclassical, industrial organization, transaction cost, and principal-agent models.

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Bibliographic Info

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This book is provided by Cambridge University Press in its series Cambridge Books with number 9780521659789 and published in 1999.

Order: http://www.cambridge.org/uk/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521659789
Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521659789

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Web page: http://www.cambridge.org

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Cited by:
  1. Harald Wiese, 2012. "Values with exogenous payments," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 72(4), pages 485-508, April.
  2. Hemant Patil, 2011. "Buyer–seller networks with demand shocks and intermediation," Review of Economic Design, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 121-145, June.
  3. Jun Muranaga, 1999. "Dynamics of Market Liquidity of Japanese Stocks: An Analysis of Tick-by-Tick Data of the Tokyo Stock Exchange," CGFS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Market Liquidity: Research Findings and Selected Policy Implications, volume 11, pages 1-25 Bank for International Settlements.
  4. Jun Muranaga & Tokiko Shimizu, 1999. "Market Microstructure and Market Liquidity," CGFS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Market Liquidity: Research Findings and Selected Policy Implications, volume 11, pages 1-28 Bank for International Settlements.
  5. Daniel F. Spulber, 2003. "The intermediation theory of the firm: integrating economic and management approaches to strategy," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(4), pages 253-266.
  6. Jun Muranaga & Tokiko Shimizu, 1999. "Expectations and Market Microstructure When Liquidity is Lost," CGFS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Market Liquidity: Research Findings and Selected Policy Implications, volume 11, pages 1-14 Bank for International Settlements.
  7. Hoppe, Heidrun C. & Ozdenoren, Emre, 2005. "Intermediation in Innovation," CEPR Discussion Papers 4891, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. David Lucking-Reiley & Daniel F. Spulber, 2000. "Business-to-Business Electronic Commerce," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0016, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
  9. Martin Peitz, 2006. "Marktplätze und indirekte Netzwerkeffekte," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 7(3), pages 317-333, 08.
  10. Toni Gravelle, 2002. "The Microstructure of Multiple-Dealer Equity and Government Securities Markets: How They Differ," Working Papers 02-9, Bank of Canada.
  11. Makoto Watanabe, 2006. "Middlemen: The Visible Market Makers," Economics Working Papers we061002, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía.
  12. Toni Gravelle, 1999. "The Market Microstructure of Dealership Equity and Government Securities Markets: How They Differ," CGFS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Market Liquidity: Research Findings and Selected Policy Implications, volume 11, pages 1-16 Bank for International Settlements.
  13. Carlos Gutiérrez-Hita & Martin Peitz, 2001. "Retailer Locations, Local Supply And Price Policies," Working Papers. Serie AD 2001-26, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).

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