Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Health care policy evaluation using longitudinal insurance claims data: An application of the Panel Tobit estimator

Contents:

Author Info

  • Paul V. Grootendorst

    (Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University and Centre for Evaluation of Medicines, St Joseph's Hospital, Hamilton, ON, Canada)

Abstract

The British Columbia Ministry of Health provides enhanced prescription drug insurance coverage to residents aged 65 and older. This exogenous change in the effective price of prescription drugs is used to investigate aspects of the drug use by seniors. Three sets of issues are of interest. First, what is the effect of enhanced insurance coverage on drug use and programme costs once drugs are provided free of charge? Second, is this effect permanent, or transitory? Third, are any increases in use observed concentrated among those with lower incomes? Longitudinal administrative claims payment data on 18 000 seniors over the period 1985-92 are used. All individuals in the sample turned 65 at some point and therefore became eligible for subsidized prescription drugs. Health status information is not collected; instead, health status is treated as an individual-specific fixed endowment, subject to a common rate of decay. Estimation is complicated by censoring of real drug expenditures for those under 65, rendering 'first differencing' methods invalid. A semi-parametric fixed effects Tobit estimator is used instead. For most individuals, the extension of insurance does not permanently increase drug use. Males with lower income were the exception. Little evidence of transitory effects to insurance coverage was found. Finally, the extension of insurance has made only a minor contribution to growth in seniors' drug use, relative to secular growth in drug use over time. © 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Download Info

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 6 (1997)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 365-382

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:6:y:1997:i:4:p:365-382

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Thomas F. Crossley & Paul Grootendorst & Sule Korkmaz & Michael R. Veall, 2000. "The Effects of Drug Subsidies on Out-of Pocket Prescription Drug Expenditures by Seniors: Regional Evidence from Canada," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers, McMaster University 19, McMaster University.
  2. Jaume Puig-Junoy & Pilar Garcia-Gomez & David Casado-Marin, 2011. "Free Medicines thanks to Retirement: Moral Hazard and Hospitalization Offsets in an NHS," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers, Tinbergen Institute 11-108/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  3. Martin Falk & Katja Seim, 2001. "The Impact Of Information Technology On High-Skilled Labor In Services: Evidence From Firm-Level Panel Data," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(4), pages 289-323.
  4. Jeonghoon Ahn, 2004. "Panel Data Sample Selection Model: an Application to Employee Choice of Health Plan Type and Medical Cost Estimation," Econometric Society 2004 Far Eastern Meetings, Econometric Society 560, Econometric Society.
  5. Sujin Kim & Soonman Kwon, 2014. "The effect of extension of benefit coverage for cancer patients on health care utilization across different income groups in South Korea," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 161-177, June.
  6. Jaume Puig-Junoy & Pilar Garcia-Gomez & David Casado-Marin, 2011. "Free Medicines thanks to Retirement: Moral Hazard and Hospitalization Offsets in an NHS," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers, Tinbergen Institute 11-108/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  7. R. Amy Puenpatom & Robert Rosenman, 2006. "Efficiency of Thai provincial public hospitals after the introduction of National Health Insurance Program," Working Papers, School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University 2006-2, School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University.
  8. Rettenmaier, Andrew J. & Wang, Zijun, 2006. "Persistence in Medicare reimbursements and personal medical accounts," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 39-57, January.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:6:y:1997:i:4:p:365-382. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.