Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Investing time in health: do socioeconomically disadvantaged patients spend more or less extra time on diabetes self-care?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Susan L. Ettner

    (Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research, Department of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA)

  • Betsy L. Cadwell

    (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA)

  • Louise B. Russell

    (Department of Economics, Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA)

  • Arleen Brown

    (Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research, Department of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA)

  • Andrew J. Karter

    (Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, CA, USA)

  • Monika Safford

    (Deep South Center on Effectiveness, Birmingham VA Medical Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA)

  • Carol Mangione

    (Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research, Department of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA)

  • Gloria Beckles

    (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA)

  • William H. Herman

    (The University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA)

  • Theodore J. Thompson

    (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA)

Abstract

Background: Research on self-care for chronic disease has not examined time requirements. Translating Research into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD), a multi-site study of managed care patients with diabetes, is among the first to assess self-care time. Objective: To examine associations between socioeconomic position and extra time patients spend on foot care, shopping|cooking, and exercise due to diabetes. Data: Eleven thousand nine hundred and twenty-seven patient surveys from 2000 to 2001. Methods: Bayesian two-part models were used to estimate associations of self-reported extra time spent on self-care with race|ethnicity, education, and income, controlling for demographic and clinical characteristics. Results: Proportions of patients spending no extra time on foot care, shopping|cooking, and exercise were, respectively, 37, 52, and 31%. Extra time spent on foot care and shopping|cooking was greater among racial|ethnic minorities, less-educated and lower-income patients. For example, African-Americans were about 10 percentage points more likely to report spending extra time on foot care than whites and extra time spent was about 3 min more per day. Discussion: Extra time spent on self-care was greater for socioeconomically disadvantaged patients than for advantaged patients, perhaps because their perceived opportunity cost of time is lower or they cannot afford substitutes. Our findings suggest that poorly controlled diabetes risk factors among disadvantaged populations may not be attributable to self-care practices. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1394
File Function: Link to full text; subscription required
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 18 (2009)
Issue (Month): 6 ()
Pages: 645-663

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:18:y:2009:i:6:p:645-663

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

Related research

Keywords:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(3), pages 93-118, Summer.
  2. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-55, March-Apr.
  3. Duan, Naihua, et al, 1983. "A Comparison of Alternative Models for the Demand for Medical Care," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 1(2), pages 115-26, April.
  4. Willard G. Manning Jr. & Charles E. Phelps, 1979. "The Demand for Dental Care," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 10(2), pages 503-525, Autumn.
  5. Cutler, David & Shapiro, Jesse & Glaeser, Edward, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese," Scholarly Articles 2640583, Harvard University Department of Economics.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Virpi Kuvaja-Köllner & Hannu Valtonen & Pirjo Komulainen & Maija Hassinen & Rainer Rauramaa, 2013. "The impact of time cost of physical exercise on health outcomes by older adults: the DR’s EXTRA Study," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 471-479, June.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:18:y:2009:i:6:p:645-663. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.