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Is Willingness to Pay for a Public Good Sensitive to the Elicitation Format?

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  • Patricia A. Champ
  • Richard C. Bishop
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    Abstract

    This study uses actual payments toward the provision of a public good to compare dichotomous choice and payment card formats. The public good in question is the environmental improvement from wind generation of electric power. We find that willingness-to-pay estimates vary with the elicitation format. Based on this result, we argue that elicitation effects found in contingent valuation studies may not be due the hypothetical nature of decision-making, as has been suggested in previous studies.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Land Economics.

    Volume (Year): 82 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 162-173

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    Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:82:y:2006:i:2:p:162-173

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    Web page: http://le.uwpress.org/

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    Cited by:
    1. Barrio, Melina & Loureiro, Maria L., 2010. "A meta-analysis of contingent valuation forest studies," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(5), pages 1023-1030, March.
    2. Carson, Richard T & Groves, Theodore, 2010. "Incentive and Information Properties of Preference Questions," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt88d8644g, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
    3. Ahlheim, Michael & Frör, Oliver & Heinke, Antonia & Duc, Nguyen Minh & Dinh, Pham Van, 2010. "Labour as a utility measure in contingent valuation studies: how good is it really?," FZID Discussion Papers 13-2010, University of Hohenheim, Center for Research on Innovation and Services (FZID).
    4. Baker, Rick & Ruting, Brad, 2014. "Environmental Policy Analysis: A Guide to Non‑Market Valuation," 2014 Conference (58th), February 4-7, 2014, Port Maquarie, Australia 165810, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    5. Michael Ahlheim & Benchaphun Ekasingh & Oliver Frör & Jirawan Kitchaincharoen & Andreas Neef & Chapika Sangkapitux & Nopasom Sinphurmsukskul, 2007. "Using Citizen Expert Groups in Environmental Valuation - Lessons from a CVM study in Northern Thailand," Diskussionspapiere aus dem Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre der Universität Hohenheim 283/2007, Department of Economics, University of Hohenheim, Germany.
    6. Brouwer, Roy & van Beukering, Pieter & Sultanian, Elena, 2008. "The impact of the bird flu on public willingness to pay for the protection of migratory birds," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 575-585, January.
    7. Frör, Oliver, 2008. "Bounded rationality in contingent valuation: Empirical evidence using cognitive psychology," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1-2), pages 570-581, December.
    8. Ahlheim, Michael & Fror, Oliver & Heinke, Antonia & Keil, Alwin & Duc, Nguyen Minh & Dinh, Pham Van & Saint-Macary, Camille & Zeller, Manfred, 2009. "Landslides in Mountainous Regions of Northern Vietnam: Causes, Protection Strategies and the Assessment of Economic Losses," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/11413, Paris Dauphine University.
    9. Charles Sims, 2013. "Hypothetical Market Familiarity and the Disconnect Between Stated and Observed Values for Green Energy," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 3(1), pages 10-19.
    10. Hoffmann, Sandra & Qin, Ping & Krupnick, Alan & Badrakh, Burmaajav & Batbaatar, Suvd & Altangerel, Enkhjargal & Sereeter, Lodoysamba, 2012. "The willingness to pay for mortality risk reductions in Mongolia," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 493-513.
    11. Paul Dolan & Robert Metcalfe, 2008. "Comparing Willingness-to-Pay and Subjective Well-Being in the Context of Non-Market Goods," CEP Discussion Papers dp0890, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    12. Shaik, Saleem & Coble, Keith H. & Hudson, Darren & Miller, James C. & Hanson, Terrill R. & Sempier, Stephen H., 2008. "Willingness to Pay for a Potential Insurance Policy: Case Study of Trout Aquaculture," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 37(1), April.
    13. Paul Dolan & Robert Metcalf, 2008. "Comparing willingness-to-pay and subjective well-being in the context of non-market goods," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 28504, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    14. Garcia, Serge & Harou, Patrice & Montagné, Claire & Stenger, Anne, 2009. "Models for sample selection bias in contingent valuation: Application to forest biodiversity," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1-2), pages 59-78, January.

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