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Grain for Green: Cost-Effectiveness and Sustainability of China’s Conservation Set-Aside Program

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  • Emi Uchida
  • Jintao Xu
  • Scott Rozelle

Abstract

Since 1999, China has pursued Grain for Green, an ambitious conservation set-aside program to prevent soil erosion. This paper evaluates its cost-effectiveness and sustainability. The results indicate that while the program has made a clear attempt to retire plots that are susceptible to soil erosion, there is room for better targeting. The government also may be able to generate fiscal savings if the payments more accurately reflect the differences in the opportunity costs of each plot. The study finds that some farmers may reconvert the land back to cultivation after program ends.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Land Economics.

Volume (Year): 81 (2005)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:81:y:2005:i:2:p247-264

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Web page: http://le.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Sylvie Démurger & Haiyuan Wan, 2012. "Payments for ecological restoration and internal migration in China: the sloping land conversion program in Ningxia," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 1-22, December.
  2. Dong Yan & Kirsten M. de Beurs & Jianrong Fan, 2013. "The Impacts of Weather and Conservation Programs on Vegetation Dynamics in China’s Loess Plateau," Land, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 2(4), pages 573-594, October.
  3. Alix-Garcia, Jennifer & Wolff, Hendrik, 2014. "Payment for Ecosystem Services from Forests," IZA Discussion Papers 8179, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Arsel, M. & Dasgupta, A., 2010. "Structural change, land use and the state in China: making sense of three divergent processes," ISS Working Papers - General Series 509, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
  5. Chau, Nancy H. & Kanbur, Ravi & Qin, Yu, 2012. "DO PUBLIC WORK SCHEMES DETER OR ENCOURAGE OUTMIGRATION? Empirical Evidence from China," Working Papers 128799, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  6. Yang, Weiyong, 2009. "Economic structural changes and rural income: Evidence from Chinese provinces during the reform period," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 742-753, December.
  7. Sylvie Démurger & Haiyuan Wan, 2012. "Payments for ecological restoration and rural labor migration in China: The Sloping Land Conversion Program in Ningxia," Post-Print halshs-00763147, HAL.
  8. Grosjean, Pauline & Kontoleon, Andreas, 2009. "How Sustainable are Sustainable Development Programs? The Case of the Sloping Land Conversion Program in China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 268-285, January.
  9. Wang, Xuehong & Bennett, Jeffrey W., 2006. "Estimating Non-Market Environmental Benefits of the Conversion of Cropland to Forest and Grassland Program: a choice modeling approach," 2006 Conference (50th), February 8-10, 2006, Sydney, Australia 139922, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  10. Xu, Zhigang & Xu, Jintao & Deng, Xiangzheng & Huang, Jikun & Uchida, Emi & Rozelle, Scott, 2006. "Grain for Green versus Grain: Conflict between Food Security and Conservation Set-Aside in China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 130-148, January.
  11. Haochi Zheng & Paul Glewwe & Stephen Polasky & Jintao Xu, 2011. "Reputation, Policy Risk,and Land Use: A Study of China’s ‘Grain for Green’ Programme," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Working Paper W, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  12. Cao, Shixiong & Wang, Xiuqing & Song, Yuezhen & Chen, Li & Feng, Qi, 2010. "Impacts of the Natural Forest Conservation Program on the livelihoods of residents of Northwestern China: Perceptions of residents affected by the program," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(7), pages 1454-1462, May.
  13. Kelly, Peter & Huo, Xuexi, 2013. "Do farmers or governments make better land conservation choices? Evidence from China's Sloping Land Conversion Program," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 32-60.
  14. Komarek, Adam M. & Waldron, Scott A. & Brown, Colin G., 2012. "An exploration of livestock-development policies in western China," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 12-20.
  15. James Roumasset & Kimberly Burnett & Hua Wang, 2007. "Is China’s Growth Sustainable?," Working Papers 200723, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
  16. Dalton, Timothy J. & Lilja, Nina K. & Johnson, Nancy & Howeler, Reinhardt, 2011. "Farmer Participatory Research and Soil Conservation in Southeast Asian Cassava Systems," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 2176-2186.

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