Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Is There Sex Discrimination in the Legal Profession? Further Evidence on Tangible and Intangible Margins

Contents:

Author Info

  • David N. Laband
  • DBernard F. Lentz

Abstract

Failure to observe differences between men and women with respect to earnings and/or promotions does not preclude the possibility that employers discriminate against women on other, intangible margins. Since female lawyers are highly educated generally, and specifically with respect to legal remedies to overt sex discrimination, it seems unlikely that employers would discriminate against them on tangible margins. Indeed, drawing from the 1984 American Bar Association Survey of Career Satisfaction/Dissatisfaction, we find no evidence of discrimination against female lawyers in terms of earnings or promotions. We do, however, find evidence of sex discrimination on several intangible margins and in terms of overall job satisfaction.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/146202
Download Restriction: A subscripton is required to access pdf files. Pay per article is available.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 28 (1993)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 230-258

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:28:y:1993:i:2:p:230-258

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Antecol, Heather & Barcus, Vanessa E. & Cobb-Clark, Deborah, 2009. "Gender-biased behavior at work: Exploring the relationship between sexual harassment and sex discrimination," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 782-792, October.
  2. Nathalie Havet, 2006. "La valorisation salariale et professionnelle de la formation en entreprise diffère-t-elle selon le sexe ? : l’exemple canadien," Working Papers 0602, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique (GATE), Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Université Lyon 2, Ecole Normale Supérieure.
  3. McNabb, Robert & Wass, Victoria, 2006. "Male-female earnings differentials among lawyers in Britain: a legacy of the law or a current practice?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 219-235, April.
  4. Antecol, Heather & Barcus, Vanessa E. & Cobb-Clark, Deborah A., 2007. "Gender-Biased Behavior at Work: What Can Surveys Tell Us About the Link Between Sexual Harassment and Gender Discrimination?," IZA Discussion Papers 2647, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Heather Antecol & Peter Kuhn, . "Is Discrimination Against Women Really Declining? The Puzzle of Survey Reports," Canadian International Labour Network Working Papers 07, McMaster University.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:28:y:1993:i:2:p:230-258. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ().

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.