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Child Labor: The Role of Financial Development and Income Variability across Countries

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Author Info

  • Dehejia, Rajeev H
  • Gatti, Roberta

Abstract

In this article, we examine the link between child labor and financial development using cross-country data. We show that child labor and financial development display a significant negative relationship, which is particularly strong in the sample of low-income countries and is robust for a wide range of specifications and estimators, including fixed-effects and instrumental variables. We identify a plausible channel through which financial development affects child labor, as we find that income variability has a sizable, positive impact on child labor in countries where financial markets are underdeveloped, although this is not the case when financial markets are developed. Our results suggest that policies aimed at widening access to credit could be effective in reducing the extent of child labor.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Economic Development and Cultural Change.

Volume (Year): 53 (2005)
Issue (Month): 4 (July)
Pages: 913-32

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:y:2005:v:53:i:4:p:913-32

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/EDCC/

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Cited by:
  1. Hazarika, Gautam & Sarangi, Sudipta, 2008. "Household Access to Microcredit and Child Work in Rural Malawi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 843-859, May.
  2. Asli Demirg��-Kunt & Ross Levine, 2009. "Finance and Inequality: Theory and Evidence," Annual Review of Financial Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 287-318, November.
  3. Jean-Paul Fitoussi & Francesco Saraceno, 2008. "The intergenerational content of social spending : health care and sustainable growth in China," Sciences Po publications 2008-27, Sciences Po.
  4. Delphine Boutin, 2011. "Envoi de fonds et allocation du temps des enfants au Niger : L'effet indirect des chocs négatifs," Working Papers hal-00637607, HAL.
  5. Calero, Carla & Bedi, Arjun S. & Sparrow, Robert, 2009. "Remittances, Liquidity Constraints and Human Capital Investments in Ecuador," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 1143-1154, June.
  6. Christian EBEKE, 2009. "The power of Remittances on the Prevalence of Child Labor," Working Papers 200924, CERDI.
  7. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:30:y:2010:i:1:p:351-364 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Alvi, Eskander & Dendir, Seife, 2011. "Weathering the Storms: Credit Receipt and Child Labor in the Aftermath of the Great Floods (1998) in Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(8), pages 1398-1409, August.
  9. Delphine Boutin, 2011. "Envoi de fonds et allocation du temps des enfants au Niger : L’effet indirect des chocs négatifs," Larefi Working Papers 1105, Larefi, Université Bordeaux 4.
  10. Shimamura, Yasuharu & Lastarria-Cornhiel, Susana, 2010. "Credit Program Participation and Child Schooling in Rural Malawi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 567-580, April.

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