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When Is Community-Based Monitoring Effective? Evidence from a Randomized Experiment in Primary Health in Uganda

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  • Martina Björkman
  • Jakob Svensson

Abstract

Evidence from recent randomized field experiments on community-based monitoring reveals substantial heterogeneous treatment effects. Using data from a randomized experiment in primary health in Uganda, we tested whether social heterogeneity can explain why some communities managed to push for better health service delivery, whereas others did not. The results suggest that income inequality, and particularly ethnic fractionalization, adversely impact collective action for improved service provision. (JEL: H41, I19, O15) (c) 2010 by the European Economic Association.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Journal of the European Economic Association.

Volume (Year): 8 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2-3 (04-05)
Pages: 571-581

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:jeurec:v:8:y:2010:i:2-3:p:571-581

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Cited by:
  1. Benjamin A. Olken & Rohini Pande, 2011. "Corruption in Developing Countries," NBER Working Papers 17398, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Lieberman, Evan S. & Posner, Daniel N. & Tsai, Lily L., 2014. "Does Information Lead to More Active Citizenship? Evidence from an Education Intervention in Rural Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 69-83.
  3. Emran, M. Shahe & Islam, Asadul & Shilpi, Forhad, 2013. "Admission is free only if your dad is rich! distributional effects of corruption in schools in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6671, The World Bank.
  4. Abigail Barr & Truman Packard & Danila Serra, 2013. "Participatory Accountability and Collective Action: Experimental Evidence from Albania," Discussion Papers 2013-08, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
  5. Devarajan, Shantayanan & Khemani, Stuti & Walton, Michael, 2011. "Civil Society, Public Action and Accountability in Africa," Working Paper Series rwp11-036, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  6. Spiros Bougheas & Alessia Isopi & Trudy Owens, . "How do Donors Allocate Funds to NGOs? Evidence from Uganda," Discussion Papers 12/08, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.

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