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Foreign direct investment and economic performance in transition economies: evidence from China

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  • Xiaowen Tian
  • Shuanglin Lin
  • Vai Io Lo
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    Abstract

    Based upon a production function with FDI representing updated technology from more developed, market-based economies, this study tests the hypothesis that FDI contributes to the economic growth of less developed, transition economies via technology updating, using data for 30 Chinese provinces from 1985 to 2000. It is found that provinces with a higher FDI ratio experienced faster technology updating and more rapid economic growth. The study suggests that less developed, transition economies should encourage FDI from more developed, market-based economies so as to accelerate technology updating and economic growth.

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    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1463137042000309584
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Post-Communist Economies.

    Volume (Year): 16 (2004)
    Issue (Month): 4 ()
    Pages: 497-510

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:pocoec:v:16:y:2004:i:4:p:497-510

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    1. Pietro Garibaldi & Nada Mora & Ratna Sahay & Jeromin Zettelmeyer, 2001. "What Moves Capital to Transition Economies?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 48(4), pages 6.
    2. Feder, Gershon, 1983. "On exports and economic growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1-2), pages 59-73.
    3. Chow, G.C., 1990. "Capital Formation And Economic Growth In China," Papers 356, Princeton, Department of Economics - Econometric Research Program.
    4. Eden, Lorraine & Levitas, Edward & Martinez, Richard J, 1997. " The Production, Transfer and Spillover of Technology: Comparing Large and Small Multinationals as Technology Producers," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 53-66, February.
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    Cited by:
    1. Agata Antkiewicz & John Whalley, 2006. "Recent Chinese Buyout Activity and the Implications for Global Architecture," NBER Working Papers 12072, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Lucyna Kornecki & Vedapuri Raghavan, 2011. "Inward FDI Stock and Growth in Central and Eastern Europe," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 1, pages 19-30, February.

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