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Globalization and the effects of changes in functional income distribution on aggregate demand in Germany

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  • Engelbert Stockhammer
  • Eckhard Hein
  • Lucas Grafl

Abstract

Germany has experienced a period of extreme nominal and real wage moderation since the mid-1990s. Contrary to the expectations of liberal economists, this has failed to improve Germany's mediocre economic performance. However, Germany is now running substantial current account surpluses. One possible explanation for Germany's disappointing performance is found in Kaleckian theory, which highlights that the domestic demand effect of a decline in the wage share will typically be contractionary, whereas net exports will increase (Blecker 1989). The size of the foreign demand effect will critically depend on the degree of openness of the economy. This paper aims at estimating empirically the demand side of a Bhaduri and Marglin (1990) type model for Germany. The paper builds on the estimation strategy of Stockhammer, Onaran, and Ederer (2009) and Hein and Vogel (2008, 2009). The main contribution lies in a careful analysis of the effects of globalization. Since Germany is a large open economy by now it is a particularly interesting case study.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal International Review of Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 25 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 1-23

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Handle: RePEc:taf:irapec:v:25:y:2011:i:1:p:1-23

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Related research

Keywords: distribution; demand; investment; consumption; foreign trade; macroeconomics; Keynesian economics; Germany; globalization;

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Cited by:
  1. Eckhard Hein & Artur Tarassow, 2008. "Distribution, aggregate demand and productivity growth - theory and empirical results for six OECD countries based on a Post-Kaleckian model," IMK Working Paper 18-2008, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
  2. Eckhard Hein & Achim Truger, 2013. "Fiscal Policy and Rebalancing in the Euro Area: A Critique of the German Debt Brake from a Post-Keynesian Perspective," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_776, Levy Economics Institute.
  3. Eckhard Hein & Achim Truger, 2008. "Fiscal policy in the macroeconomic policy mix: A Critique of the New Consensus Model and a comparison of macroeconomic policies in France, Germany, the UK and Sweden from a Post-Keynesian perspective," IMK Working Paper 03-2008, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
  4. Greg Hannsgen & Dimitri B. Papadimitriou, 2012. "Fiscal Traps and Macro Policy after the Eurozone Crisis," Economics Public Policy Brief Archive ppb_127, Levy Economics Institute.
  5. Eckhard Hein & Christian Schoder, 2011. "Interest rates, distribution and capital accumulation -- A post-Kaleckian perspective on the US and Germany," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(6), pages 693-723, November.
  6. Jochen Hartwig, 2014. "Testing the Bhaduri-Marglin Model with OECD Panel Data," KOF Working papers 14-349, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
  7. Hein, Eckhard, 2011. "Distribution, 'financialisation' and the financial and economic crisis: Implications for post-crisis economic policies," IPE Working Papers 09/2011, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute for International Political Economy (IPE).
  8. Hiroaki Sasaki & Ryunosuke Sonoda & Shinya Fujita, 2012. "International Competition and Distributive Class Conflict in an Open Economy Kaleckian Model," Discussion papers e-12-005, Graduate School of Economics Project Center, Kyoto University.
  9. Engelbert Stockhammer & Robert Stehrer, 2011. "Goodwin or Kalecki in Demand? Functional Income Distribution and Aggregate Demand in the Short Run," Review of Radical Political Economics, Union for Radical Political Economics, vol. 43(4), pages 506-522, December.
  10. Hein, Eckhard & Dodig, Nina, 2014. "Financialisation, distribution, growth and crises: Long-run tendencies," IPE Working Papers 35/2014, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute for International Political Economy (IPE).
  11. Jochen Hartwig, 2013. "Ist Lohnzurückhaltung gut oder schlecht für das Schweizer Wirtschaftswachstum?," KOF Analysen, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich, vol. 7(2), pages 33-45, June.
  12. Engelbert Stockhammer & Ozlem Onaran, 2013. "Wage-led growth: theory, evidence, policy," Review of Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar, vol. 1(1), pages 61-78, January.
  13. Olivier Allain, 2011. "The impact of income distribution on consumption: a reassessment," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00712657, HAL.
  14. Hein, Eckhard & Truger, Achim, 2013. "Future fiscal and debt policies: Germany in the Context of the European Monetary Union," IPE Working Papers 24/2013, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute for International Political Economy (IPE).

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