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The Unequal Distribution of Job Insecurity, 1966-86

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  • Brendan Burchell
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    Abstract

    In the first half of this paper the evidence concerning the costs of job insecurity is presented. There is now sufficient good research data to conclude that job insecurity is damaging to psychological health, marriages and employee motivation, and contributes to 'cycles of disadvantage'. In the second half of this paper, flows out of secure and insecure jobs are analysed using a work-histories dataset. Not only is it the case that flows from secure to insecure jobs were more common in the 1980s than in the 1970s and 1960s, but it is also apparent that the risk of a transition from a secure job into an insecure job is much greater for those in less advantaged jobs. The negative consequences of this further polarisation of the UK labour market are discussed.

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    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/026921799101625
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal International Review of Applied Economics.

    Volume (Year): 13 (1999)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 437-458

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:irapec:v:13:y:1999:i:3:p:437-458

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    References

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    1. Heaney, Catherine A. & Israel, Barbara A. & House, James S., 1994. "Chronic job insecurity among automobile workers: Effects on job satisfaction and health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 38(10), pages 1431-1437, May.
    2. Casey, Bernard, 1988. "The Extent and Nature of Temporary Employment in Britain," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(4), pages 487-509, December.
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    Cited by:
    1. Vincenzo Carrieri & Cinzia Di Novi & Rowena Jacobs & Silvana Robone, 2012. "Well-being and psychological consequences of temporary contracts: the case of younger Italian employees," Working Papers 079cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    2. Gash, Vanessa & Mertens, Antje & Romeu Gordo, Laura, 2006. "Are fixed-term jobs bad for your health? A comparison between Western Germany and Spain," Working Papers 27, Institute of Management Berlin (IMB), Berlin School of Economics and Law.
    3. Chris Dawson & Michail Veliziotis, 2013. "Temporary employment, job satisfaction and subjective well-being," Working Papers 20131309, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.

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