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Work�-�life imbalance: Informal care and paid employment in the UK

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  • Fiona Carmichael
  • Claire Hulme
  • Sally Sheppard
  • Gemma Connell
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    Abstract

    In the United Kingdom, informal carers look after relatives or friends who need extra support because of age, physical or learning disability, or illness. The burden of informal care work falls on women, who often care for longer hours and durations than men. This paper considers the impact that caring responsibilities have on women's employment. The research is based on a dedicated questionnaire and in-depth interviews with informal caregivers. The results suggest that carers' employment is affected by the duration of a caring episode, financial considerations, the needs of the person they care for, carers' beliefs about the compatibility of informal care and paid work, and employers' willingness to accommodate carers' needs. Overall, the research confirms that informal carers continue to face difficulties when they try to combine employment and care in spite of recent policy initiatives designed to help them.

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    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13545700701881005
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Feminist Economics.

    Volume (Year): 14 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 3-35

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:14:y:2008:i:2:p:3-35

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    Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/RFEC20

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    Related research

    Keywords: Caregiving; labor supply; unpaid work; JEL Codes: D13; J14; J17;

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    Cited by:
    1. Siobhan Austen & Rachel Ong & Therese Jefferson & Rhonda Sharp & Gill Lewin, 2013. "Elder care and the employment intentions of mature age women," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1310, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    2. Andreas Kotsadam, 2012. "The employment costs of caregiving in Norway," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 269-283, December.
    3. Kotsadam, Andreas, 2009. "Effects of informal eldercare on female labor supply in different European welfare states," Working Papers in Economics 353, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.

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