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R&D, public innovation policy, and productivity: The case of danish manufacturing

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  • Anders S�rensen
  • Hans Christian Kongsted
  • Mats Marcusson

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between private R&D, public innovation support transferred to the private sector, and productivity in Danish manufacturing. Two main conclusions are established. First, public innovation support has a positive and significant effect on private R&D expenditures with an estimated elasticity of 0.062. Second, the indirect effect on productivity from public innovation support is reflected in a positive point estimate which is found to be robust to different specifications of R&D capital.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10438590303126
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Economics of Innovation and New Technology.

Volume (Year): 12 (2003)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 163-178

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Handle: RePEc:taf:ecinnt:v:12:y:2003:i:2:p:163-178

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Related research

Keywords: Growth; Research And Development; Innovation Support; Productivity;

References

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  1. Stephen Machin & John Van Reenen, 1998. "Technology And Changes In Skill Structure: Evidence From Seven Oecd Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 113(4), pages 1215-1244, November.
  2. Paul A. David and Bronwyn H. Hall., 2000. "Heart of Darkness: Modeling Public-Private Funding Interactions Inside the R&D Black Box," Economics Working Papers, University of California at Berkeley E00-275, University of California at Berkeley.
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  4. Manuelli, Rodolfo E., 1994. "Capital fundamentalism, economic development, and economic growth: A comment," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 293-300, June.
  5. Charles I. Jones & John C. Williams, 1998. "Measuring The Social Return To R&D," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 113(4), pages 1119-1135, November.
  6. Nadiri, M Ishaq & Prucha, Ingmar R, 1996. "Estimation of the Depreciation Rate of Physical and R&D Capital in the U.S. Total Manufacturing Sector," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, Western Economic Association International, vol. 34(1), pages 43-56, January.
  7. Pesaran, M. Hashem & Smith, Ron, 1995. "Estimating long-run relationships from dynamic heterogeneous panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 79-113, July.
  8. Howard Pack, 1994. "Endogenous Growth Theory: Intellectual Appeal and Empirical Shortcomings," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 55-72, Winter.
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  10. Anders Sorensen, 2001. "Comparing Apples to Oranges: Productivity Convergence and Measurement across Industries and Countries: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 91(4), pages 1160-1167, September.
  11. M Pesaran & Yongcheol Shin & Ron P Smith, 2004. "Pooled mean group estimation of dynamic heterogeneous panels," ESE Discussion Papers, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh 16, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
  12. Johansen, Soren, 1988. "Statistical analysis of cointegration vectors," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 231-254.
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Cited by:
  1. Spyros Arvanitis & Nora Sydow & Martin Woerter, 2005. "Is There Any Impact of University-Industry Knowledge Transfer on the Performance of Private Enterprises? – An Empirical Analysis Based¨on Swiss Firm Data," KOF Working papers, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich 05-117, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
  2. Spyros Arvanitis & Nora Sydow & Martin Woerter, 2008. "Is there any Impact of University–Industry Knowledge Transfer on Innovation and Productivity? An Empirical Analysis Based on Swiss Firm Data," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 77-94, March.

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