Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Does the Linder effect hold for differentiated agri-food and beverage product trade?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Zahoor Ul Haq
  • Karl Meilke

Abstract

Using a generalized gravity equation, this study tests for the Linder effect in differentiated agri-food product trade, i.e. as the demand structures of two countries become more similar, their trade intensity increases. Two proxies of demand structure, the Balassa index and the absolute value of the difference in per capita Gross Domestic Products (GDPs) of trading partners, are used to capture the Linder effect. In addition, two measures of bilateral trade, the Grubel and Lloyd (GL) index, and the value of bilateral trade are used as the dependent variable. This study investigates the role of the Linder effect in explaining the trade of 37 differentiated agri-food and beverage products categorized into eight product groups: cereals, fresh fish, frozen fish, vegetables, fresh fruit, processed fruit, tea and coffee and alcoholic beverages. The data covers trade across 52 developed and developing countries from 1990 to 2000. The type of proxy used for the Linder effect and the way in which bilateral trade is measured influence the outcome of the statistical tests for the Linder effect. The Linder effect for cereals, frozen fish, vegetables, processed fruits and tea and coffee, using the value of trade as the dependent variable, is often accepted, but it is generally rejected when the GL index is used as the measure of trade intensity. In brief, the results do not provide strong support for the Linder effect in the trade of differentiated agri-food products.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036846.2010.484000
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 43 (2011)
Issue (Month): 27 ()
Pages: 4095-4109

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:43:y:2011:i:27:p:4095-4109

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEC20

Order Information:
Web: http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/RAEC20

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Curzi, Daniele & Olper, Alessandro, 2012. "Export behavior of Italian food firms: Does product quality matter?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 493-503.
  2. Mitchell Kellman & Mitchell Yochanan Shachmurove, 2012. "Trade Sophistication in a Transition Economy: Poland 1980–2009," Working Papers 64, Department of Applied Econometrics, Warsaw School of Economics.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:43:y:2011:i:27:p:4095-4109. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael McNulty).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.