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Skill-biased technological knowledge without scale effects

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  • Oscar Afonso

Abstract

In the skill-biased technological change literature, the technological-knowledge bias, which drives wage inequality, is determined by the market-size channel. Motivated by the literature on scale effects since Jones (1995a, b), the standard R&D technology is modified so that wage inequality results similarly from the technological-knowledge bias, which is instead induced by the price channel. Thus, by solving the transitional dynamics numerically, it is shown that the recent rise of the skill premium, which is highlighted by, e.g., Acemoglu (2002a), arises from the price-channel effect, complemented with a mechanism that can be called technological-knowledge-absorption effect.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 38 (2006)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 13-21

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:38:y:2006:i:1:p:13-21

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Sochirca, Elena & Gil, Pedro Mazeda & Afonso, Oscar, 2014. "Technology structure and skill structure: Costly investment and complementarity effects quantification," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 172-189.
  2. Afonso, Oscar & Alves, Rui Henrique & Vasconcelos, Paulo B., 2009. "Public deficits and economic growth," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 1101-1109, September.
  3. Afonso, Oscar & Leite, Rui, 2010. "Learning-by-doing, technology-adoption costs and wage inequality," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1069-1078, September.
  4. Afonso, Óscar & Thompson, Maria, 2011. "Costly investment, complementarities and the skill premium," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 2254-2262, September.
  5. Nuno Torres & Óscar Afonso & Isabel Soares, 2013. "Manufacturing skill-biased wage inequality, natural resources and institutions," CEF.UP Working Papers 1303, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
  6. Óscar Afonso & Armando Silva, 2011. "Non-scale endogenous growth effects of subsidies for exporters," FEP Working Papers 429, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
  7. Sochirca, Elena & Afonso, Óscar & Gil, Pedro Mazeda, 2013. "Technological-knowledge bias and the industrial structure under costly investment and complementarities," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 440-451.
  8. Óscar Afonso & Maria Thompson, 2009. "Costly Investment, Complementarities and the Skill Premium," FEP Working Papers 323, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
  9. Toshihiro Okada, 2012. "Wage Inequality, R&D Labor and R&D Productivity," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(4), pages 3036-3052.
  10. Orachos Napasintuwong Artachinda, 2011. "Modeling Directions of Technical Change in Agricultural Sector," Working Papers 201101, Kasetsart University, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
  11. Afonso, Oscar & Gil, Pedro Mazeda, 2013. "Effects of North–South trade on wage inequality and on human-capital accumulation," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 481-492.

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