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The missing shock: the macroeconomic impact of British Privatizations

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  • Emanuele Bacchiocchi
  • Massimo Florio
  • Mara Grasseni

Abstract

In this paper the impact of privatization on macroeconomic performance in the United Kingdom is tested using quarterly data from 1979 to 1999. Privatization proceeds have been included in a simple analytical framework dealing with both demand and supply-side of the economy. Multivariate cointegration techniques have been used in order to consider the nonstationarity of the time series involved. The empirical results show that privatizations have no long-run effects on output in the UK. This result is consistent with microeconomic evidence that shows that in the UK ownership change per se had little impact on long term productivity trends. Moreover it is found that privatization proceeds have contributed to sustaining public expenditures.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 37 (2005)
Issue (Month): 14 ()
Pages: 1585-1596

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:37:y:2005:i:14:p:1585-1596

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  1. Søren Johansen & Katarina Juselius, 1992. "Identification of the Long-Run and the Short-Run Structure: An Application to the ISLM Model," Discussion Papers 92-04, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  2. Emanuele Bacchiocchi & Massimo Florio & Mara Grasseni, 2005. "The missing shock: the macroeconomic impact of British Privatizations," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(14), pages 1585-1596.
  3. Johansen, Soren, 1991. "Estimation and Hypothesis Testing of Cointegration Vectors in Gaussian Vector Autoregressive Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(6), pages 1551-80, November.
  4. G. A. Mackenzie, 1998. "The Macroeconomic Impact of Privatization," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 45(2), pages 363-373, June.
  5. Willem H. Buiter, 1990. "Principles of Budgetary and Financial Policy," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262524139, December.
  6. Steven Barnett, 2000. "Evidenceon the Fiscal and Macroeconomic Impact of Privatization," IMF Working Papers 00/130, International Monetary Fund.
  7. repec:imf:imfpdp:97/9 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Davidson, James E H, et al, 1978. "Econometric Modelling of the Aggregate Time-Series Relationship between Consumers' Expenditure and Income in the United Kingdom," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 88(352), pages 661-92, December.
  9. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Orietta DESSY & Massimo FLORIO, 2004. "Workers' earnings in the UK before and after privatisation: a study of five industries," Departmental Working Papers 2004-13, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
  2. Massimo Florio & Mara Grasseni, 2004. "The Missing Shock: The Macroeconomic Impact of British Privatisation," Working Papers 2004.104, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  3. Schuster, Philipp & Schmitt, Carina & Traub, Stefan, 2013. "The retreat of the state from entrepreneurial activities: A convergence analysis for OECD countries, 1980–2007," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 95-112.

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