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Do informal risk sharing networks crowd out public voluntary health insurance? Evidence from Vietnam

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  • Matthew Jowett
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    Abstract

    Many governments in low-income countries have promoted voluntary health insurance schemes in recent years, with the principal aim of improving access to services amongst those working in the informal economy. Few attempts to understand demand for such schemes exist, particularly in light of the importance of informal social security arrangements for many households. A model of demand for health insurance is developed reflecting this context, and estimated using data from Vietnam. The results show that informal financial networks may crowd out government promoted health insurance. Implications for theory and policy are discussed.

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    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0003684032000079152
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

    Volume (Year): 35 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 10 ()
    Pages: 1153-1161

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:35:y:2003:i:10:p:1153-1161

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    Cited by:
    1. BONAN Jacopo & DAGNELIE Olivier & LEMAY-BOUCHER Philippe & TENIKUE Michel, 2012. "Is it all about Money? A Randomized Evaluations of the Impact of Insurance Literacy and Marketing Treatments on the Demand for Health Microinsurance in Senegal," CEPS/INSTEAD Working Paper Series 2012-03, CEPS/INSTEAD.
    2. Delavallade, Clara, 2014. "Quality healthcare and health insurance retention: Evidence from a randomized experiment in the Kolkata slums:," IFPRI discussion papers 1352, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Joshua Blumenstock & Nathan Eagle & Marcel Fafchamps, 2011. "Risk and Reciprocity Over the Mobile Phone Network: Evidence from Rwanda," CSAE Working Paper Series 2011-19, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    4. Farrin, Kathleen M. & Miranda, Mario J., 2013. "Premium Benefits? A Heterogeneous Agent Model of Credit-Linked Index Insurance and Farm Technology Adoption," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 149666, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Fink, Günther & Robyn, Paul Jacob & Sié, Ali & Sauerborn, Rainer, 2013. "Does health insurance improve health?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1043-1056.
    6. Eling, Martin & Pradhan, Shailee & Schmit, Joan T., 2013. "The Determinants of Microinsurance Demand," Working Papers on Finance 1308, University of St. Gallen, School of Finance.
    7. Goktuna, Bilge Ozturk & Dayangac, Renginar, 2011. "Rethinking the informal labour from an evolutionary point of view," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 609-615.
    8. Chaudhuri, Anoshua & Roy, Kakoli, 2008. "Changes in out-of-pocket payments for healthcare in Vietnam and its impact on equity in payments, 1992-2002," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 38-48, October.
    9. Mladovsky, Philipa & Mossialos, Elias, 2008. "A Conceptual Framework for Community-Based Health Insurance in Low-Income Countries: Social Capital and Economic Development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 590-607, April.
    10. Wagstaff, Adam & Pradhan, Menno, 2005. "Health insurance impacts on health and nonmedical consumption in a developing country," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3563, The World Bank.
    11. De Allegri, Manuela & Sanon, Mamadou & Bridges, John & Sauerborn, Rainer, 2006. "Understanding consumers' preferences and decision to enrol in community-based health insurance in rural West Africa," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 76(1), pages 58-71, March.
    12. Bernal, Noelia & Carpio, Miguel A. & Klein, Tobias J., 2014. "The Effects of Access to Health Insurance for Informally Employed Individuals in Peru," IZA Discussion Papers 8213, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Rebecca L. Thornton & Laurel E. Hatt & Erica M. Field & Mursaleena Islam & Freddy Solís Diaz & Martha Azucena González, 2010. "Social security health insurance for the informal sector in Nicaragua: a randomized evaluation," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(S1), pages 181-206, September.
    14. Mladovsky, Philipa & Soors, Werner & Ndiaye, Pascal & Ndiaye, Alfred & Criel, Bart, 2014. "Can social capital help explain enrolment (or lack thereof) in community-based health insurance? Results of an exploratory mixed methods study from Senegal," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 18-27.

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