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Adult equivalence scales and food expenditures: an application to Mexican beef and pork purchases

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  • Brian Gould
  • Hector Villarreal

Abstract

In the analysis of food expenditures, the use of a simple count of household members as an estimate of household size implicitly assumes each household member has the same marginal impact. In this analysis of Mexican food expenditures, endogenously determined adult equivalence scales are estimated in such a way that these marginal impacts are allowed to vary by household member age and gender. The results of a series of hypothesis tests indicate a rejection of the implied null hypothesis of equal marginal expenditure impacts associated with the use of the traditional count based household size variable. This study also rejects the null hypothesis of the equality of adult equivalent scales across the commodities included in this analysis.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036840110074141
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 34 (2002)
Issue (Month): 9 ()
Pages: 1075-1088

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:34:y:2002:i:9:p:1075-1088

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Cited by:
  1. Hovhannisyan, Vardges & Gould, Brian W., 2010. "Quantifying the Structure of Food Demand in China Using a Generalized Quadratic AIDS Specification," 2010 Annual Meeting, February 6-9, 2010, Orlando, Florida 56422, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
  2. Takashi Ishida & Noriko Ishikawa & Mototsugu Fukushige, 2006. "Impact of BSE and Bird Flu on Consumersf Meat Demand in Japan," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 06-01, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
  3. Lopez, Jose Antonio & Malaga, Jaime E., 2009. "Forecast and Simulation Analysis of Mexican Meat Consumption at the Table Cut Level: Impacts on U.S. Exports," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 51986, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  4. Lopez, Jose Antonio & Malaga, Jaime E., 2009. "Estimation of a Censored Demand System in Stratified Sampling: An Analysis of Mexican Meat Demand at the Table Cut Level," 2009 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2009, Atlanta, Georgia 46294, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
  5. Dong, Diansheng & Gould, Brian W., 2007. "Product Quality and the Demand for Food: The Case of Urban China," China's Agricultural Trade: Issues and Prospects Symposium, July 2007, Beijing, China 55030, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
  6. Lopez, Jose Antonio & Malaga, Jaime E. & Chidmi, Benaissa & Belasco, Eric J. & Surles, James, 2012. "Mexican Meat Demand at the Table Cut Level: Estimating a Censored Demand System in a Complex Survey," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 43(2), July.
  7. Zhong, Funing & Xiang, Jing & Zhu, Jing, 2012. "Impact of demographic dynamics on food consumption — A case study of energy intake in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 1011-1019.

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