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Human capital and international knowledge spillovers in TFP growth of a sample of developing countries: an exploration of alternative approaches

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  • Hans-Jurgen Engelbrecht
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    Abstract

    This study tests and compares the two major approaches to the modelling of human capital in growth regressions, i.e. the Lucas and the Nelson-Phelps approach, in the context of developing country models with international knowledge spillovers. On balance, the results seem to favour the Nelson-Phelps approach. Using human capital stock variables instead of flow variables, a positive role for human capital in the absorption of international knowledge spillovers other than embodied R&D spillovers is confirmed. The results suggest the importance of distinguishing between different types of international knowledge spillovers, as well as between different human capital sub-categories.

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    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036840110061947
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

    Volume (Year): 34 (2002)
    Issue (Month): 7 ()
    Pages: 831-841

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:34:y:2002:i:7:p:831-841

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    Cited by:
    1. Dulleck, Uwe & Foster, Neil, 2008. "Imported Equipment, Human Capital and Economic Growth in Developing Countries," Economic Analysis and Policy (EAP), Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Economics and Finance, vol. 38(2), pages 233-250, September.
    2. Matthias Busse & José Luis Groizard, 2006. "Technology Trade in Economic Development," DEA Working Papers 22, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Departament d'Economía Aplicada.
    3. Gumbau-Albert, Mercedes & Maudos, Joaquin, 2009. "Patents, technological inputs and spillovers among regions," MPRA Paper 15260, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Aurora A.C. Teixeira & Natércia Fortuna, 2006. "Human capital, trade and long-run productivity. Testing the technological absorption hypothesis for the Portuguese economy, 1960-2001," FEP Working Papers 226, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    5. Eberhardt, Markus & Teal, Francis, 2009. "Econometrics for Grumblers: A New Look at the Literature on Cross-Country Growth Empirics," MPRA Paper 15813, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Władysław Welfe, 2008. "A Knowledge-Based Economy: New Directions of Macromodelling," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 167-180, May.
    7. Raffaello Bronzini & Paolo Piselli, 2006. "Determinants of long-run regional productivity: the role of R&D, human capital and public infrastructure," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 597, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    8. Neil Foster-McGregor & Johannes Pöschl, 2009. "The Importance of Labour Mobility for Spillovers across Industries," wiiw Working Papers 58, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    9. Luis Gil-Alana & Pedro Mendi, 2005. "Fractional integration in total factor productivity: evidence from US data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(12), pages 1369-1383.

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