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The European agricultural trade policies and poverty

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  • L. Alan Winters

Abstract

This paper tries to estimate the effects of reforming European agricultural trade policy on poverty in Europe and in the developing world. After setting out a conceptual framework linking trade and poverty, it describes a detailed computable general equilibrium modelling exercise showing the effects on poverty of a possible agreement in the Doha Round of the World Trade Organization. It then conducts a global simulation on European agricultural liberalisation and by comparing it with the Doha simulations infers the poverty effects in the developing world. These are benign but not very large. This does not change the case for reform, however; the Common Agricultural Policy harms trade relations with developing countries and causes poverty in Europe. Copyright 2005, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics in its journal European Review of Agricultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 32 (2005)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 319-346

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Handle: RePEc:oup:erevae:v:32:y:2005:i:3:p:319-346

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Cited by:
  1. Kym Anderson & Ernesto Valenzuela, 2007. "Do Global Trade Distortions Still Harm Developing Country Farmers?," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 143(1), pages 108-139, April.
  2. Diogo, V. & Koomen, E. & Hilst, F. van der, 2012. "Second generation biofuel production in the Netherlands. A spatially-explicit exploration of the economic viability of a perennial biofuel crop," Serie Research Memoranda 0004, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
  3. Nadia Belhaj Hassine & Véronique Robichaud & Bernard Decaluwé, 2010. "Agricultural Trade Liberalization, Productivity Gain and Poverty Alleviation: a General Equilibrium Analysis," Cahiers de recherche 1022, CIRPEE.
  4. Fleming, Euan M. & Fleming, Pauline, 2007. "Evidence on trends in the single factoral terms of trade in African agricultural commodity production," 81st Annual Conference, April 2-4, 2007, Reading University 7980, Agricultural Economics Society.
  5. Meade, Birgit & Regmi, Anita & Seale, James L. Jr & Muhammad, Andrew, 2014. "New International Evidence on Food Consumption Patterns: A Focus on Cross-Price Effects Based on 2005 International Comparison Program Data," Technical Bulletins 165687, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  6. Surabhi Mittal, 2007. "Oecd Agricultural Trade Reforms Impact On India’s Prices And Producers Welfare," Trade Working Papers 22225, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  7. Oskam, Arie J. & Meester, Gerrit, 2006. "How useful is the PSE in determining agricultural support?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 123-141, April.

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