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Zimbabwean Trade Liberalisation: Ex Post Evaluation

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Author Info

  • Rattso, Jorn
  • Torvik, Ragnar

Abstract

The recent trade liberalization in Zimbabwe offers an opportunity of understanding short-run adjustment responses to reform. The immediate experience involved contraction in output and employment, a consumption boom, the inflow of imports, and a rising trade deficit. The analytical challenge is to disentangle the effects of liberalization from the serious drought that coincided with it. An economywide CGE model is used for counterfactual experiments. The opening-up of final goods markets is shown to contribute to deindustrialization and contraction. Copyright 1998 by Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Cambridge Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 22 (1998)
Issue (Month): 3 (May)
Pages: 325-46

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Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:22:y:1998:i:3:p:325-46

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Cited by:
  1. Margaret Chitiga & Tonia Kandiero & Ramos Mabugu, 2005. "Computable General Equilibrium Micro-Simulation Analysis of the Impact of Trade Policies on Poverty in Zimbabwe," Working Papers MPIA 2005-01, PEP-MPIA.
  2. Kakarlapudi, Kiran Kumar, 2010. "The Impact of Trade Liberalisation on Employment: Evidence from India’s Manufacturing Sector," MPRA Paper 35872, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 10 Jan 2012.
  3. Rattso, Jorn & Torvik, Ragnar, 1998. "Economic openness, trade restrictions and external shocks: modelling short run effects in Sub-Saharan Africa," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 257-286, April.
  4. Eddy Lee, 2005. "Trade Liberalization and Employment," Working Papers 5, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
  5. Mehlum, Halvor, 2002. "Zimbabwe: Investments, credibility and the dynamics following trade liberalization: on the investment response during trade reform," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 565-584, August.
  6. Balogun, Emmanuel Dele & Dauda, Risikat O. S., 2012. "Poverty and employment impact of trade liberalization in Nigeria: empirical evidence and policy implications," MPRA Paper 41006, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 05 Sep 2012.
  7. Mansoorian, Arman & Mohsin, Mohammed, 2010. "On the employment, investment, and current account effects of trade liberalizations with durability in consumption," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 228-240, December.

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