Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Should we abandon activity type analysis? Redefining activities by their salient attributes

Contents:

Author Info

  • Sean Doherty

    ()

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This paper poses a challenge and begins a search. The challenge is to reconsider the usefulness of traditional activity types (“work”, “shopping”, etc.) in the understanding and modelling of travel behaviour. The search is for the more salient attributes of activities that may serve to better explain complex travel behaviours—such as activity scheduling and tour formation. In particular, this paper focuses on explicit measures of the spatial, temporal and interpersonal flexibility of activities, along with several traditional attributes (frequency, duration, involved persons, travel time, and location). Data from a recent in-depth week-long activity scheduling survey was used to define and compare these attributes. Results show that considerable variability in the attributes between and within traditional activity groups is evident. This casts considerable uncertainty on assumptions that statically assign levels of spatial, temporal, and interpersonal flexibility to any given activity type. A Principal Components Analysis further revealed eight new distinct clusters of activities that share like attributes. The relative role of each attribute in each component is examined, and subjective interpretations emerged (e.g., “Long and frequent”, “Space and time flexible” “Social networking”). The implications of these results for future model development and research are discussed. Future research should continue to expand the search for salient attributes and link them more directly to decision processes. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11116-006-0001-9
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Transportation.

    Volume (Year): 33 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 6 (November)
    Pages: 517-536

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:kap:transp:v:33:y:2006:i:6:p:517-536

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=103007

    Related research

    Keywords: Travel behaviour; Activities; Activity type; Flexibility; Scheduling;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Sean Doherty & Eric Miller, 2000. "A computerized household activity scheduling survey," Transportation, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 75-97, February.
    2. Bowman, J. L. & Ben-Akiva, M. E., 2001. "Activity-based disaggregate travel demand model system with activity schedules," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 1-28, January.
    3. T. Limanond & D.A. Niemeier & P.L. Mokhtarian, 2005. "Specification of a tour-based neighborhood shopping model," Transportation, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 105-134, 03.
    4. Ryuichi Kitamura & Cynthia Chen & Ram Pendyala & Ravi Narayanan, 2000. "Micro-simulation of daily activity-travel patterns for travel demand forecasting," Transportation, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 25-51, February.
    5. Tim Schwanen & Martin Dijst, 2003. "Time windows in workers' activity patterns: Empirical evidence from the Netherlands," Transportation, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 261-283, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Auld, Joshua & Mohammadian, Abolfazl (Kouros) & Doherty, Sean T., 2009. "Modeling activity conflict resolution strategies using scheduling process data," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 386-400, May.
    2. Akar, Gulsah & Clifton, Kelly J. & Doherty, Sean T., 2012. "Redefining activity types: Who participates in which leisure activity?," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(8), pages 1194-1204.
    3. Linda Nijland & Theo Arentze & Harry Timmermans, 2014. "Multi-day activity scheduling reactions to planned activities and future events in a dynamic model of activity-travel behavior," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 71-87, January.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:transp:v:33:y:2006:i:6:p:517-536. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Guenther Eichhorn) or (Christopher F. Baum).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.