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Measuring the Economic Costs and Benefits of the EU

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  • Patrick Minford

Abstract

The EU has pursued protectionist policies not merely in food but also in manufacturing at the customs union level. In services it has not dismantled much of the existing national protectionism. The economic costs are calculated here at some 3% of GDP for the UK and some 2% for the rest of the EU. Added to its social interventionism, these costs suggest that the EU has put political integration before economic efficiency. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2006

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11079-006-0362-x
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Open Economies Review.

Volume (Year): 17 (2006)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 509-524

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Handle: RePEc:kap:openec:v:17:y:2006:i:4:p:509-524

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100323

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Keywords: protectionism; manufactures; anti-dumping; tariff equivalent; customs union; competition;

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  1. Scott Bradford & Robert Z. Lawrence, 2004. "Has Globalization Gone Far Enough: The Costs of Fragmented Markets," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 349.
  2. Scott Bradford, 2003. "Paying the Price: Final Goods Protection in OECD Countries," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(1), pages 24-37, February.
  3. Jonathan Haskel & Holger Wolf, 2000. "From Big Macs to iMacs," World Economics, World Economics, Economic & Financial Publishing, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 1(2), pages 167-178, April.
  4. Thai-Thanh Dang & Pablo AntolĂ­n & Howard Oxley, 2001. "Fiscal Implications of Ageing: Projections of Age-Related Spending," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 305, OECD Publishing.
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