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Universities and the success of entrepreneurial ventures: evidence from the small business innovation research program

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  • Donald Siegel

    ()

  • Charles Wessner

    ()

Abstract

There has been little direct, systematic empirical analysis of the role that universities play in enhancing the success of entrepreneurial ventures. We attempt to fill this gap by analyzing data from the US SBIR program, a “set-aside” program that requires key federal agencies (e.g., Department of Defense) to allocate 2.5% of their research budget to small firms that attempt to commercialize new technologies. Based on estimation of Tobit and negative binomial regressions of the determinants of commercial success, we find that start-ups with closer ties to universities achieve higher levels of performance. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal The Journal of Technology Transfer.

Volume (Year): 37 (2012)
Issue (Month): 4 (August)
Pages: 404-415

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:37:y:2012:i:4:p:404-415

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=104998

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Keywords: University technology transfer; Small business innovation research program (SBIR); Commercialization; Entrepreneurship; M13; O31; O32; O38;

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  1. Albert N. Link & Christopher J. Ruhm, 2008. "Bringing Science to Market: Commercializing from NIH SBIR Awards," NBER Working Papers 14057, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Audretsch, David B. & Link, Albert N. & Scott, John T., 2002. "Public/private technology partnerships: evaluating SBIR-supported research," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 145-158, January.
  3. Zucker, Lynne G & Darby, Michael R & Brewer, Marilynn B, 1998. "Intellectual Human Capital and the Birth of U.S. Biotechnology Enterprises," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(1), pages 290-306, March.
  4. Di Gregorio, Dante & Shane, Scott, 2003. "Why do some universities generate more start-ups than others?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 209-227, February.
  5. Albert N. Link & John T. Scott, 2009. "Private Investor Participation and Commercialization Rates for Government-sponsored Research and Development: Would a Prediction Market Improve the Performance of the SBIR Programme?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 76(302), pages 264-281, 04.
  6. Zucker, Lynne G & Darby, Michael R, 2001. " Capturing Technological Opportunity via Japan's Star Scientists: Evidence from Japanese Firms' Biotech Patents and Products," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 26(1-2), pages 37-58, January.
  7. Marie Thursby & Richard Jensen, 2001. "Proofs and Prototypes for Sale: The Licensing of University Inventions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 240-259, March.
  8. Scott Shane & Toby Stuart, 2002. "Organizational Endowments and the Performance of University Start-ups," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 48(1), pages 154-170, January.
  9. O'Shea, Rory P. & Allen, Thomas J. & Chevalier, Arnaud & Roche, Frank, 2005. "Entrepreneurial orientation, technology transfer and spinoff performance of U.S. universities," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(7), pages 994-1009, September.
  10. Scott Shane, 2002. "Selling University Technology: Patterns from MIT," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 48(1), pages 122-137, January.
  11. Colombo, Massimo G. & Grilli, Luca, 2005. "Founders' human capital and the growth of new technology-based firms: A competence-based view," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 795-816, August.
  12. Zucker, Lynne G & Darby, Michael R & Armstrong, Jeff, 1998. "Geographically Localized Knowledge: Spillovers or Markets?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 36(1), pages 65-86, January.
  13. Frank T. Rothaermel & Shanti D. Agung & Lin Jiang, 2007. "University entrepreneurship: a taxonomy of the literature," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(4), pages 691-791, August.
  14. Link, Albert N. & Scott, John T., 2010. "Government as entrepreneur: Evaluating the commercialization success of SBIR projects," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 589-601, June.
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Cited by:
  1. David Audretsch & Erik Lehmann & Mike Wright, 2014. "Technology transfer in a global economy," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 301-312, June.

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