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A comparison of parametric and semiparametric estimates of the effect of spousal health insurance coverage on weekly hours worked by wives

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  • Craig A. Olson

    (School of Business & Industrial Relations Research Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 975 University Ave, Madison, WI 53706-1323, USA)

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    Abstract

    Health insurance in the USA for most of the non-aged population is provided as a fringe benefit that is received by an adult family member as part of his or her compensation package. In husband and wife households health insurance is more likely to be part of the husband's compensation package than the wife's compensation package. However, when a husband does not have employer-provided health insurance, his wife may seek health insurance through an employer. Because health insurance through one's employer typically requires that a worker is a full-time employee, spousal health insurance coverage for wives is predicted to influence their labour supply decisions. Parametric and semiparametric statistical models using March 1993 CPS data show wives without spousal health benefits are more likely to work full-time than those who do have spousal health benefits. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of Applied Econometrics.

    Volume (Year): 13 (1998)
    Issue (Month): 5 ()
    Pages: 543-565

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    Handle: RePEc:jae:japmet:v:13:y:1998:i:5:p:543-565

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    Cited by:
    1. Brigitte Madrian, 2006. "The U.S. Health Care System and Labor Markets," NBER Working Papers 11980, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Shin-Yi Chou & Jin-Tan Liu & James K. Hammitt, 2002. "Health Insurance and Households' Precautionary Behaviors - An Unusual Natural Experiment," NBER Working Papers 9394, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Kreider, Brent & Hill, Steven C., 2005. "Partially Identifying Treatment Effects with an Application to Covering the Uninsured," Staff General Research Papers 12296, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    4. Stephen B. DeLoach & Jennifer M. Platania, 2008. "The Macroeconomic Consequences of Financing Health Insurance," Working Papers 2008-04, Elon University, Department of Economics.
    5. Zimmer, David M., 2010. "The role of health insurance in labor supply decisions of divorced females," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 121-131, May.
    6. Jody Schimmel, 2006. "Men With Health Insurance and the Women Who Love Them: the Effect of a Husband's Retirement on His Wife's Health Insurance Coverage," Working Papers wp131, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    7. David Zimmer, 2009. "Insurance Arrangements Among Married Couples: Analysis of Benefit Substitution and Compensating Differentials," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(4), pages 428-439, December.
    8. Royalty, Anne Beeson & Abraham, Jean M., 2006. "Health insurance and labor market outcomes: Joint decision-making within households," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(8-9), pages 1561-1577, September.
    9. Jason Murasko, 2008. "Married Women’s Labor Supply and Spousal Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: Results from Panel Data," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 391-406, September.
    10. Jonathan Gruber & Brigitte C. Madrian, 2002. "Health Insurance, Labor Supply, and Job Mobility: A Critical Review of the Literature," NBER Working Papers 8817, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Dey, Matthew & Flinn, Christopher, 2008. "Household search and health insurance coverage," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 145(1-2), pages 43-63, July.
    12. Bradley, Cathy J. & Bednarek, Heather L. & Neumark, David, 2002. "Breast cancer survival, work, and earnings," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 757-779, September.
    13. Shin-Yi Chou & Jin-Tan Liu & James Hammitt, 2006. "Households’ precautionary behaviors—the effects of the introduction of National Health Insurance in Taiwan," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 395-421, December.
    14. Kuo-Liang Chang & George Langelett & Andrew Waugh, 2011. "Health, Health Insurance, and Decision to Exit from Farming," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 356-372, June.
    15. Iskhakov, Fedor, 2008. "Dynamic Programming Model of Health and Retirement," Memorandum 03/2008, Oslo University, Department of Economics.

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