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Lone mothers, family credit and paid work

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Author Info

  • Andrew Dilnot

    (Institute for Fiscal Studies and University of Oxford)

  • Alan Duncan

    ()
    (Institute for Fiscal Studies and University of Nottingham)

Abstract

Social security payments are typically thought of as being aimed at those who are not in paid work, whether because of age, ill health, caring responsibilities or involuntary unemployment. The great bulk of social security expenditure does go to such groups, and most social security recipients fall outside the paid labour market. But there is a potential role for social security in encouraging paid work, by giving benefits to those in work on low incomes which shift the balance between in-work and out-of-work income. The principal such benefit in the UK is family credit (FC), which replaced family income supplement in 1998. FC entitlement exists for low-paid families with children, provided they work 24 hours per week or more. Receipt of FC should guarantee a substantially higher net income than is available while out of work. In 1990 there were 313,000 families receiving FC, of whom 40 per cent were lone-parent families.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Institute for Fiscal Studies in its journal Fiscal Studies.

Volume (Year): 13 (1992)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 1-21

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Handle: RePEc:ifs:fistud:v:13:y:1992:i:1:p:1-21

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Cited by:
  1. John Creedy & Alan Duncan, 2001. "Aggregating Labour Supply and Feedback Effects in Microsimulation," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2001n15, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  2. Richard Blundell, 1993. "Offre de travail et fiscalité : une revue de la littérature," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 108(2), pages 1-18.
  3. Ledic, Marko, 2012. "Estimating Labor Supply at the Extensive Margin in the presence of Sample Selection Bias," MPRA Paper 55745, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Hilary Hoynes & Richard Blundell, 2001. "Has "In-Work" Benefit Reform Helped the Labour Market?," NBER Working Papers 8546, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Pedersen, Peder J. & Smith, Nina, 2002. "Unemployment Traps: Do Financial Dis-incentives matter?," CLS Working Papers 01-1, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Centre for Labour Market and Social Research.
  6. Richard Blundell, 1995. "Tax policy reform: why we need microeconomics," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 16(3), pages 106-125, January.
  7. Richard Blundell & Alan Duncan & Julian McCrae & Costas Meghir, 2000. "The labour market impact of the working families’ tax credit," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 21(1), pages 75-103, March.
  8. Richard Blundell & Alan Duncan & Julian McCrae & Costas Meghir, 2000. "Evaluating In-Work Benefit Reform: The Working Families Tax Credit in the U.K," JCPR Working Papers 160, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  9. Wolfgang Ochel, 2000. "Employment-conditional tax credit and benefit systems," CESifo Forum, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 1(3), pages 35-41, October.
  10. Staat, Matthias & Wagenhals, Gerhard, 1996. "Lone Mothers: A Review," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 131-40, May.
  11. Keshab Bhattarai & John Whalley, 1997. "The Redistributive Effects of Transfers," NBER Working Papers 6281, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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